Math Facts Practice Online: Add, Subtract, Multiply, Divide

Searching for a program to practice math facts online that will help your learner power through their math facts and have fun?

Rocket Math Online Game offers effective addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division practice, and students have a blast doing it! Why do they love the game? The game helps students quickly and methodically memorize math facts, which means less frustration and more fun! The game also shows students their progress with exciting, rocket ship-themed graphics and audio to keep them motivated to learn more. It turns out that students learn better and are more motivated to continue when they can clearly see their progress. Who knew?

How Rocket Math’s online math game works

Too many children still count on their fingers to figure out basic addition facts. If a child continues to spend hours counting on their fingers, it is a sure way to make them hate math. Professors of education frequently teach that “all rote learning is bad for children.” This is not true when it comes to math facts. Memorizing basic facts is a necessary step (to free up working memory) on the path to higher-order thinking in math, and by skipping math fact memorization, teachers are handicapping their students. As a result of the dogma against memorization, few new teachers have any idea how to effectively help their students memorize.

For example, giving students a worksheet full of problems that they haven’t been able to memorize isn’t going to help. Nor will a computer practice game that randomly gives problems for students to solve. A good math program will provide students with a few math facts at a time to work through before adding more. 

Student with Rocket Chart filled out

Rocket Math Online Game does just this. Starting with two math facts and their reverse, the game won’t let the student move on until they can answer these math problems instantly. Rocket Math Online Game will then gradually, carefully, and systematically add new facts to those already learned. Students have to answer in 3 seconds or less, or they have to do that part over until they can answer the math fact immediately. They will work through set A to set Z with 26 levels in three phases; Take-Off, Orbit, and Universe. Each time they complete a set, the tile for that set explodes and falls away. As students progress through the levels, they can fill out the Rocket Chart to see their progress and stay motivated. 

Addition Math Facts Practice in Rocket Math Online Game

First-grade students should begin working on the first Learning Track: Addition 1s through 9s math facts and have all those facts memorized first. With Rocket Math Online Game, there are three Learning Tracks to choose from for your first-grade class.

  • The Basic Learning Track
    • 1. Addition 1s through 9s
  • The Alternative Learning Track: learning addition and subtraction facts in families
    • 5. Fact Families (+, -) to 10
  • Optional Learning Track
    • 7. Add to 20

If you notice a student is taking more than a week to pass a level in sets A-Z of Addition 1s through 9s, that’s a sign for you to intervene. Often this means that the child is struggling and needs to practice more. They need to logon and practice at home in addition to their practice in school. The first graders who can finish the Learning Track for Addition 1s though 9s, can move on to the Optional Learning Track, Add to 20. Advanced first graders who are very quickly mastering facts can certainly move into the Learning Tracks recommended below for 2nd grade.  

There is an alternative sequence of learning addition and subtraction facts, through Fact Families.  Fact Families introduces addition and subtraction facts at the same time in “families” such as 1+3, 3+1, 4-3, 4-1. Because the facts are introduced in families students are able to switch back and forth between addition and subtraction as they are learning. Rocket Math breaks up the fact families into a Learning Track with addition and subtraction facts up to 10 to begin in first grade and then a second Learning Track of facts from 11 that follows after, either in first grade or second.   

Subtraction Math Facts Practice in Rocket Math Online Game

Many teachers think subtraction facts are harder for children to learn.The reason they seem harder to learn is that most children don’t fully master addition before they start memorizing subtraction facts. When that happens, the two operations interfere with one another (officially, it’s known as proactive and retroactive inhibition), and subtraction facts become harder to learn.

Students who work through the addition sets in Rocket Math Online Game, will not find this to be a problem. Once the student has mastered the addition facts, they will quickly recognize that subtraction facts are “the opposite” of addition. The interference does not happen, and the students will feel good about their progress and learn to do computation with ease. 

Rocket Math Online Game offers these Learning Tracks for second graders to master subtraction:

  • The Basic Learning Tracks
    • 1. Addition 1s through 9s
    • 2. Subtraction 1s through 9s
  • The Alternative Learning Tracks: learning addition and subtraction facts in families
    • 5. Fact Families (+, -) to 10
    • 6. Fact Families (+, -) from 11
  • Optional Learning Tracks
    • 7. Add to 20
    • 8. Subtract from 20

Second graders who did not learn addition Math Facts in first grade must focus on addition facts first. After they have gotten through Set Z of addition, they can move on to 2. Subtraction 1s through 9s.

Second-grade students who complete addition and subtraction 1s-9s can start Add to 20 and then go on to Subtracting from 20. 

As noted above,  learning by fact families is an alternative route to learning basic addition and subtraction facts.  The first Learning Track would be #5 Fact Families (+, -) to 10 followed by #6 Fact Families (+, -) from 11. 

 

Multiplication Math Facts Practice in Rocket Math Online Game

Being able to multiply is harder than addition or subtraction because you can’t count on your fingers. While it is necessary for students to memorize the “times facts,” they are seldom systematically taught. Preservice teachers are frequently taught that “rote learning is bad for children.” This is not true, but as a result, most new teachers have no idea how to effectively help their students memorize. Memorizing basic facts is a necessary step (to free up working memory) on the path to higher-order thinking in math, and by skipping math fact memorization, teachers are handicapping their students.

Rocket Math Online Game offers these Learning Tracks for third graders to master multiplication: 

 

 

  • The Basic Learning Tracks
    • 3. Multiplication 1s through 9s (priority)
    • 1. Addition 1s through 9s (if still not mastered)
    • 2. Subtraction 1s through 9s (if still not mastered)
  • The Alternative Learning Track: learning multiplication and division facts in families
    • 11. Fact Families (x,÷) to 20 
  • Optional Learning Track
    • 9. Multiplication 10s-11s-12s 

In third grade, multiplication has priority, and students must master it first even if they have not mastered addition and subtraction. Higher-level math students who may not have mastered addition and subtraction will only be crippled more without learning multiplication. Once the student has mastered multiplication, then go back and work on mastering addition and subtraction. When students have mastered all three of these basic operations, they can move on to 9. Multiplication 10s-11s-12s. And of course, advanced third graders who have learned the concept of division can move into the Learning Tracks recommended below for fourth grade students.  

There is an alternative sequence of learning multiplication and division facts, through Fact Families.  Fact Families introduces multiplication and division facts at the same time in “families” such as 4×5, 5×4, 20÷4, 20÷5. Because the facts are introduced in families students are able to switch back and forth between multiplication and division as they are learning.  Rocket Math breaks up the multiplication and division fact families into facts up to 20 to begin in third grade and then a second Learning Track of facts from 20 follows after, either in third grade or fourth.

Division Math Facts Practice in Rocket Math Online Game

The key to learning division facts is to learn them gradually. Students should work a few minutes at a time and then take a break. Rocket Math Online Game has students work for five minutes at a time (although the teacher can increase it to 10 or 15 minutes if the student wants it), and then the game pauses for a 20-minute break. Breaks will help keep students from becoming tired of the game and ensure they want to keep playing. Learning Math Facts is a marathon, not a sprint, so we want them to do Rocket Math once or twice a day for a few months. That’s how they will come to master the math facts.

Typically, students learn division in fourth or fifth grade, but they can learn it earlier if they understand the concept. Division isn’t harder than multiplication, but it will be if students have not mastered multiplication first. That’s why having students work through Set Z of multiplication before starting division is essential.

Here are the Learning Tracks offered by Rocket Math Online Game:

 

 

  • The Basic Learning Tracks
    • 3. Multiplication 1s through 9s (priority)
    • 4. Division 1s through 9s (secondary priority)
  • The Alternative Learning Tracks: learning multiplication and division facts in families
    • 11. Fact Families (x,÷) to 20 
    • 12. Fact Families (x,÷) from 21
  • Optional Learning Tracks
    • 9. Multiplication 10s-11s-12s
    • 10. Division 10s-11s-12s

When they have mastered multiplication and the 1s-9s of division, students can go on to Multiplication 10s-11s-12s and Division 10s-11s-12s.

As noted above, learning by fact families is an alternative route to learning basic multiplication and division facts.  The first Learning Track would be #11 Fact Families (x,÷) to 20 followed by #12 Fact Families (x,÷) from 21. 

Rocket Math Online Game – The Best Tool to Learn Math Facts

Mastering the basic facts in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division will not only help students succeed in school, but are essential skills to have outside of the classroom. If you want your students to be successful at math and enjoy learning, memorizing these math facts is vital. With Rocket Math Online Game, your students will be engaged and excited to play. Students will be able to see their progress, celebrate their wins, and take pride in what they learn. It doesn’t take much to motivate your students, just a sincere recognition of their achievement. They will know when they have accomplished something, and if you recognize it as well, then they will feel proud of themselves.

There’s a free two-week trial of the Rocket Math Online Game so you can see for yourself how well it works and how students love it.

Both programs for one teacher and class for one low price.

Choose #2500 both programs for your class for $88 and get a bonus

$88 Individual Both Programs (30 seats) subscription

Tried-and-true Rocket Math fact fluency worksheets

[A $49 value] Our Rocket Math Worksheet Program has students practice daily with a partner, take a One-Minute Test, and move up the Rocket Chart based on the ten-minutes per day pencil-and-paper activities.  Teachers have been relying on this program and getting gratifying results for decades.  This subscription will give you access to the Rocket Math filing cabinet and all of the hundreds of worksheets available to print from our virtual filing cabinet.  

 

30 seats for the Online Game develops math fact fluency in a fast-paced format

 

 

[A $60 value] In 2018, Rocket Math added an Online Game for students to play on any device and learn math facts.  This package will give access to up to 30 students in your classroom.  The regular price for 30 students is $2 per student for the year.

In the Online Game, students login and practice and work through levels A to Z the same as in the Worksheet Program. If a student takes longer than 3 seconds to answer a fact, the program treats it as a hesitation and gives more practice on that fact.  The program responds to hesitations by telling the student the problem and answer, asking them to enter the correct answer, then giving them the problem again a few seconds later. 

Students can also login in at home and practice there.  The Rocket Math Online Game is very intense, so learners can only work for five minutes at a time, and then the game makes them take a 30-minute break.  Although the game is challenging (or maybe because it is hard), students are very motivated by seeing their progress.  They can tell that they are learning and they feel good about their accomplishments.  

 

You can monitor the development of math fact fluency in the game

The teacher can monitor progress (as you can see below).  The teacher can see if students are logging on at home, see their level of difficulty, and change them to a different one of the ten learning tracks available.  Easy to set up a program of recognition for students who practice at home.  

Bonus: Wall Charts visually track development of math fact fluency

[An $18 value] As a bonus in this package Rocket Math will send you a Rocket Math Wall Chart. This chart comes with stickers for students to post each time they pass a level in Rocket Math.  It has goal arrows, so the teacher can set goals for the class with rewards for filling up the chart to a certain point.  This enables the students to work together to achieve goals and celebrate their success as a group.  Also comes with directions on how to use it to best advantage.   

This chart is a very motivating for students as they are developing math fact fluency and builds team spirit with your class. 

Two math fact fluency programs from Rocket Math for one low price with a bonus

Choose both programs for the Whole School for $695 and get a bonus

Whole School Both Program subscription

Tried-and-true Rocket Math fact fluency worksheets

[A $300 value] Our Rocket Math Worksheet Program has students practice daily with a partner, take a One-Minute Test, and move up the Rocket Chart based on the ten-minutes per day pencil-and-paper activities.  Teachers have been relying on this program and getting gratifying results for decades.  This subscription will give all the teachers in your building access to the Rocket Math filing cabinet and all of the hundreds of worksheets available to print from our virtual filing cabinet.  Purchased by itself the All Teacher Universal Worksheet Program costs $300.

Online Game develops math fact fluency in a fast-paced format

 

 

[A $400 to $900 value] In 2018, Rocket Math added an Online Game for students to play on any device and learn math facts.  This package will give access to all the students in your school, without regard to how many there are.  The regular price for 100 or more students is $1 per student for the year. So if your school has fewer than 395 students in your building, you want to buy the programs separately.

In the Online Game, students login and practice and work through levels A to Z the same as in the Worksheet Program. If a student takes longer than 3 seconds to answer a fact, the program treats it as a hesitation and gives more practice on that fact.  The program responds to hesitations by telling the student the problem and answer, asking them to enter the correct answer, then giving them the problem again a few seconds later. 

The Rocket Math Online Game is very intense, so learners can only work for five minutes at a time, and then the game makes them take a 30-minute break.  Although the game is challenging (or maybe because it is hard), students are very motivated by seeing their progress.  They can tell that they are learning and they feel good about their accomplishments.  

 

Teachers can monitor the development of math fact fluency in the game

The teacher can monitor progress (as you can see below).  The teacher can see if students are logging on at home, see their level of difficulty, and change them to a different one of the ten learning tracks available. 

Bonus: Wall Charts visually track development of math fact fluency

[A $405 value] As a bonus in this package Rocket Math will send Rocket Math Wall Charts for every teacher participating in the program.  This chart comes with stickers for students to post each time they pass a level in Rocket Math.  It has goal arrows, so the teacher can set goals for the class with rewards for filling up the chart to a certain point.  This enables the students to work together to achieve goals and celebrate their success as a group.  Also comes with directions on how to use it to best advantage.   

This chart is a very motivating for students as they are developing math fact fluency.  It also allows the principal to view and praise students for their success in Rocket Math.  

Math Facts App Comparison: Rocket Math vs. XtraMath

There are plenty of math facts apps out there that let students practice math facts they have already learned.  Few apps actually teach math facts.  But apps from Rocket Math and XtraMath are exceptions.  While both apps teach students math facts, one is more effective and fun.

The two best apps for actually teaching math facts

Math facts apps from Rocket Math and XtraMath effectively teach math facts because they have four essential characteristics:

  1. Both math facts apps require students to demonstrate fluency with facts.  Fluency means a student can quickly answer math fact questions from recall.  This is the opposite of letting a student “figure it out” slowly.  Neither app considers a fact mastered until a student can answer a fact consistently within 3 seconds.
  2. Both math facts apps zero in on teaching (and bringing to mastery) a small number of facts at a time.  This is the only way to teach math fact fluency. It’s impossible for students to learn and memorize a large number of facts all at once.
  3. Both math facts apps are responsive.  Apps simply do not teach if they randomly present facts or do not respond differently when students take a long time to answer a fact.
  4. Both math facts apps only allow students to work for a few minutes (less than ten) before taking a break.  Teachers and parents may want to keep students busy practicing math facts for an hour, but students will come to hate the app if they have long sessions.  A few minutes of practice in each session is the best way to learn and to avoid student burnout.
  5. Both math facts apps re-teach the fact if a student makes an error.  While both Rocket Math and XtraMath re-teach facts, they re-teach them differently.

While both apps contain these important features and teach math facts, there are a few vital elements that make an effective app like Rocket Math standout.

An effective app gives a student a sense of accomplishment

The difficult thing about learning math facts is that there are so many to learn.  It takes a while and students have to persevere through boring memorization tasks. The best way to help students learn their math facts is to give them a clear sense of accomplishment as they move through each task.

How XtraMath monitors progress

To develop a sense of accomplishment among its app users, XtraMath displays math facts on a grid.  XtraMath tests the student and marks the ones that are answered quickly (within 3 seconds) with smiley faces.  It takes a couple of sessions to determine what has been mastered and what hasn’t, so there isn’t a sense of accomplishment at first.  This grid is displayed and explained, but it’s not easy to monitor progress.  Over time, there are fewer squares with facts to learn, but there isn’t clear feedback on what’s being accomplished as students work.

How Rocket Math monitors progress

Conversely, Rocket Math begins recognizing student progress immediately and continues to celebrate progress at every step.  The Rocket Math app begins with Set A and progresses up to Set Z.  Each lettered set has three phases: Take-Off, Orbit, and the Universe.  That means there are 78 milestones celebrated in the process of moving from Set A to Set Z.

Take-Off phase has only 2 problems (and their reverses) repeated three times.  The student just has to get all 12 correct to move on.  When the student does that, the doors close (with appropriate sound effects) to show “Mission Accomplished.” They also are congratulated by Mission Control.  “Mission Control here.  You did it!  Mission Accomplished! You took off with Set A!  Go for Orbit if you dare!”  With this type of consistent (and fun!) recognition, students clearly understand that they are progressing, and they get the chance to keep learning “if they dare!”

In addition to the three phases, students progress through the sets from A to Z.  Each time a student masters a set, by going through all three phases, the student gets congratulated and taken to their rocket picture, as shown above.  When a level is completed, the tile for that level explodes (with appropriate sound effects) and drops off the picture, gradually revealing more of the picture as tiles are demolished.

In the picture above, the tile for “N” has just exploded. After the explosion, a student is congratulated for passing Level N and encouraged to go for Level O if they dare.   When you talk to students about Rocket Math, they always tell you what level they have achieved.  “I’m on Level K!” a student will announce with pride.  That sense of accomplishment is important for them to keep chugging along.

An effective math facts app correct errors—correctly

Neither of these math fact apps allow errors to go uncorrected.  Students will never learn math facts from an app that does not correct errors.  That puts these two apps head and shoulders above the competition.  However, these two apps correct errors very differently.

How XtraMath corrects errors

On the left, you can see the XtraMath correction is visual.  If a student enters the wrong answer, the app crosses the incorrect answer out in red and displays the correct answer in gray.  A student then has to enter the correct answer that they see. This is a major mistake. In this case, students don’t have to remember the answer. They just have to enter the numbers in gray.

How Rocket Math corrects errors

Rocket Math, however, provides only an auditory correction.  When a student answers incorrectly, the screen turns orange and Mission Control recites the correct problem and answer.  In the pictured situation, Mission Control says, “Three plus 1 is four.  Go again.”  Under these conditions, the student has to listen to the correction and remember the answer, so they can enter it correctly.

Following an incorrect answer to a target problem, the app presents two more problems. Then it presents the previously target problem, on which the student made the error, again.

If the student answers the previously missed problem correctly within the three seconds, the game notes the error, and the student continues through the phase.  If the student fails to answer the problem correctly again, the correction process repeats until the student answers correctly.  Having to listen to and remember the answer, rather than just copy the answer, helps students learn better.

An effective math app gives meaningful feedback

Without feedback, students can’t learn efficiently and get frustrated. But the feedback cannot be generic. It has to dynamically respond to different student behavior.

How XtraMath’s app gives feedback

XtraMath’s charming “Mr. C” narrates all of the transitions between parts of each day’s lesson.  He welcomes students, says he is happy to see them, and updates students on their progress.  He gives gentle, generic feedback about how you’re getting better and to remember to try to recall the facts instead of figuring them out.  However, his feedback remains the same no matter how you do.  In short, it is non-contingent feedback, which may not be very meaningful to students.

How Rocket Math’s app gives feedback

Differing from XtraMath, Rocket Math offers students a lot of feedback that is contingent. Contingent feedback means that students will receive different types of feedback depending on their responses.

The Rocket Math app gives positive feedback for all the 78 accomplishments noted above.  It also doles out corrective feedback when the student isn’t doing well.

As noted above, students receive corrective feedback on all errors. They get feedback when they take longer than three seconds to answer too.  The “Time’s Up” screen on the right pops up and Mission Control says, “Ya’ gotta be faster!  Wait.  Listen for the answer.”  And then the problem and the correct answer are given.  Students get a chance to answer that fact again soon and redeem themselves–proving they can answer it in 3 seconds.

The app tracks errors and three strikes mean the student has to “Start Over” with that phase. At that point, the doors close (with appropriate sound effects) and then the student has to hit “go” and the doors open (with appropriate sound effects) to try it again.

When it comes to recognizing a student’s success, the Rocket Math app holds nothing back. After a student completes a phase, Mission Control gives enthusiastic congratulations as noted above.

Typically, students don’t have to “start over” more than once or twice in a phase, but they still feel a real sense of accomplishment when they do complete the phase.  The feedback students get from Rocket Math matters because they have to work hard to earn it.

How much does an effective math facts app cost?

It is hard to beat the price of XtraMath, which is free.  XtraMath is run by a non-profit based in Seattle.  They have a staff of six folks in Seattle, and they do accept donations.  Their product is great, and they are able to give it away.

Rocket Math is run by one person, Dr. Don.  He supports the app, its development and himself with the proceeds.  He answers his own phone and is happy to talk with teachers about math facts.  The Rocket Math Online Game is a good value at $1 a year per seat (when ordering 100 or more seats).  Twenty to 99 seats are $2 each. And fewer than 20 seats cost $3.89 each per year.  As one principal-customer of Rocket Math said, “We used to have XtraMath.  We’d rather pay a little bit for Rocket Math because the kids like it better.”

Add Login info for classes with csv file

Assign Subscriptions. The orange box on your dashboard shows the number “Unassigned Subscriptions” you have that can be assigned to students. You can give these subscriptions to students by using the blue + Import Students Logins From CSV button.
That page–the pop-up labeled “Import Student Logins From CSV” looks like this picture to the left.
Begin at #1 and click on “CSV template to fill in” to get a properly formatted starting point.
See the blank csv template to the right. You’ll enter the student’s first and last name, make up a username and a passcode for the student. Enter the code number for the learning track they will start in. You can change it at any time. Add the Teacher Mgr’s email if you wish to connect the student to a different teacher that you set up in your account.
Once you have completed the file, save it to your computer as a CSV file (it’s an excel file now, so you have to choose Save As and find Comma Separated Value -CSV in the list).
Now go back to the pop-up labeled “Import Student Logins From CSV” and do #2 Choose file and browse to the csv file you just saved and select it. Then go to the bottom of the page at #3 and hit the blue button that says “Parse CSV.”
After you hit “Parse CSV” you’ll see a list of your students. Scroll to the bottom and hit the blue button that says “Import Students.” Then they will be set up in the system.
If something goes wrong, you can use the red button on your Dashboard that says “Delete ALL students!” It is extreme, but it will clear out all of your student data, allowing you to start over and re-import.
If you have a bunch of trouble, send me your csv files and I will do the import for you. -Dr.Don

Add Login info individually for Online Game

If you have few enough students, you can simply add their login information individually.  In your dashboard click on the blue button that days + Add Student Login.

Up pops this dialog box.  Enter the student’s first and last name, then create a username and passcode.  It only has to be unique to your school or family, so make it simple and easy to enter.

Then be sure to choose a Learning Track from the pull-down menu.

If you are the owner, you are also the first teacher.  If you have other Teacher Managers, be sure to connect the student with the teacher you want.  After you hit the green Save button your student is ready to play.

Adding Teacher Managers to Online Game

The person who first sets up the account is the owner (probably you).
The owner is automatically the first teacher.
 
Next, if you need help, you can set up additional teachers and give them subscriptions.
Go to the Teacher Mgr page by clicking on the Teacher Managers link in the left hand navigation.
Then click the blue Add Teacher Mgr button in the upper right.
You’ll see this dialog box (below) in which you enter the name and email. Don’t worry if you give them the wrong number of subscriptions.  When you enter the csv file with the student logins, there is a place to enter the teacher for each student.  The system will increase the number of subscriptions given to each teacher if necessary to accommodate what is in the csv file.
When you hit the green “Create” button the system will create a password for that teacher and email it to the email you entered for them.  It’s a hard password, so they might want to change it.
Don’t wait too long to let the teacher know about the incoming information or they’ll miss the email and won’t know how to enter the system.
Repeat as needed to add more Teacher Mgrs to help you monitor students.
Next, you will go on to assign student login information to your “unassigned” subscriptions so the students can login and play.

Choose a Learning Track for Online Game

Choose from ten Learning Tracks

In the Rocket Math Online Game every student needs to be started in one of the ten Learning Tracks.  A student’s Learning Track can be changed at any time**, but one must be chosen to begin with.

If you are entering the Student Login individually, you can use the pull down menu to select a learning track, as illustrated to the right.

The ten learning tracks are numbered as follows. If you are using the csv method of entry you’ll need to enter the number for the track.

  1. Addition 1s through 9s
  2. Subtraction 1s through 9s
  3. Multiplication 1s through 9s
  4. Division 1s through 9s
  5. Fact Familes (1 to 10) add and subtract, ex.4+5, 5+4, 9-4, 9-5
  6. Fact Families (11 to 18) add and subtract, ex. 8+7, 7+8, 15+7, 15-8
  7. Add to 20, example 13+4, 4+13,
  8. Subtract from 20, example 15-3, 15-12,
  9. Multiplication 10s-11s-12s,
  10. Division 10s-11s-12s.

You can click below to see a google document showing all the problems learned in each of the Learning Tracks.

Click to see the problems in the tracks.

Considerations, or what to choose when?

Begin with the basics.  The four basic operations are most important and typical expectations is one of those per grade level, so Addition in first, Addition then Subtraction in second, Multiplication, then go back to Addition and Subtraction in third, and Multiplication then Division in fourth grade, and then going back to get Addition and Subtraction if those haven’t been learned.  Make sure your student have worked through the expected basic operations for their grade level BEFORE doing any of the other optional Learning Tracks.

Another way to learn basic Addition and Subtraction Facts.  Learning in Fact Families is another order to learn. Fact Familes (1 to 10) add and subtract would be chosen in first grade.   Fact Families (11 to 18) add and subtract would be mastered in second grade.  You can choose this sequence instead of the basic addition and basic subtraction fact Learning Tracks.   Optionally, Fact Families is also a good way to review for students who have already learned the basic addition and subtraction facts in first or second grade.

Optional Learning Tracks. Add to 20 and Subtract from 20 are additional problems that the Common Core feels should be committed to memory.  They are composed of facts you can figure out if you know the basic 1s through 9s facts, but can be learned AFTER the basics are learned, if there is time in first or second grade.  They should not be assigned until after the student has mastered the basic 1s through 9s addition and subtraction facts.

After students learn the basic 1s through 9s multiplication facts, if there is time, they can move on to 10s, 11s, 12s.  After basic 1s through 9s  division facts are learned (and all the other basic operations are learned) then the 10s, 11s, and 12s are a good use of time.

 

**See “How to change Learning Tracks” in the FAQs and Directions document.

How to purchase Online Game subscriptions

Here’s information (that may not be apparent) about how to purchase Online Game subscriptions.  First you register for a free account at https://admin.rocketmath.com for the Rocket Math Online Game.  The next step is to to purchase game subscriptions with our No risk 30 day trial. 

Non-credit card options

 

If you wish to buy subscriptions by sending in a Purchase Order here’s a link to our order form. Or, if you wish to order online with either PayPal or a PO number click this link to get to that page

Either in PayPal or with a PO we will give you 13 months for the one year price, and if you tell us you no longer want your subscriptions during the first month, we’ll cancel your subscriptions and cancel the invoice. With PayPal we’ll give you a full refund if you don’t want to keep your subscription.    

If you ask, I can also manually give you a 30 day free trial–without you having to enter a payment method.  I’ll give you access to all the subscriptions you’d need for your free trial period.  Then, if you wish to continue and purchase we can send an invoice.  Just contact [email protected], with the number of subscriptions you would like to use during your free trial. 

Credit card procedure

Go to the “My Profile” page to order subscriptions.  There you click on + Add Subscriptions on the “My Profile” page of your account.  It looks like this picture. 

No gotcha here–See how the auto-renew is turned off by default?  

After you click on + Add Subscriptions this dialog box will pop up.

This person in this picture has payments set to yearly.  So the price for one subscription is $3.89 for the year.

If you leave it set to monthly, the price will be $.50 (50 cents/month).
To order more than one subscription hover in the box and you’ll see arrows to increase the number of subscriptions.  This box will automatically discount to $2 for quantities of 20 or more and down to $1 for quantities of 100 or more.
Hit the green payment data to pay with a credit card.  You’ll get this Stripe dialog box.  You fill out your credit card info and hit the pay button, but remember, you will not be charged a thing for 30 days.

Monthly, non auto-renewal expires if you don’t act.

Note: As long as you leave the renewal period set to monthly, and leave auto renew set to OFF in your profile, then your subscription will simply end after 30 days.  No matter how many subscriptions you order, your credit card won’t be charged until you login and renew.  So you can try the game for free to see if it’s worth paying for with no risk of being charged for it.  When you decide it is worthwhile, come back into “My Profile” switch the renewal period to yearly, and make sure you have as many subscriptions as you want, and then change to “Auto Renew.”   You can switch it back  to non renew after you renew, but there’s no other way to renew ahead of time with the credit card.  But if your subscription has expired, you will see a green “Renew Subscription” button in “My Profile” and you can click on that to renew.

Yearly renewal gives you lower prices (and still no charge for the first month).

If you are pretty certain, go ahead and set the renewal to yearly and then order your subscriptions.  You’ll get the best price and you’ll automatically get the discounts for quantity.  Your credit card will not be charged until the end of your 30 day trial, so if you cancel before then you do not pay a thing.

 

Get a free 30-day trial of our Online Game

Here’s information (that may not be apparent) about the next step–after registering for a free account for the Rocket Math Online Game.  The next step is to to try out the game with some students by signing up for our No risk 30 day trial. 

Your credit card will not be charged until the end of your 30 day trial, so if you cancel before then you do not pay a thingYou can order from the “My Profile” page of your account with a credit card to order subscriptions. It looks like this picture. 

No gotcha here–See how the auto-renew is turned off by default?  

Leave the renewal period set to monthly, and leave auto renew set to OFF in your profile.

Your subscription will simply end after 30 days.

No matter how many subscriptions you order, your credit card won’t be charged until you login and renew.  So you can try the game for free to see if it’s worth paying for with no risk of being charged for it.

Non-credit card options

If you wish to buy subscriptions by sending in a Purchase Order here’s a link to our order form. Or, if you wish to order online with either PayPal or a PO number click this link to get to that page

Either in PayPal or with a PO we will give you 13 months, and if you tell us you don’t want it during the first month, we’ll cancel your subscription and cancel the invoice. With PayPal we’ll give you a full refund if you don’t want to keep it.    

If you ask, I can also manually give you a 30 day free trial–without you having to enter a payment method.  Then we can send an invoice if you wish to continue.  Just contact [email protected], with the number of subscriptions you would like to use during your free trial.