6.A.3) How to address complaints about the game being too fast

 You can change things on the green Individual Action Button

When you want to change something for an individual student, go to the green button at the end of that student’s row that says Individual Action.”  Pull down for a short menu, outlined in green in this picture.

Yes, you can change Game Speed, but should you? 

a student who does not know her math facts is counting on her fingers.You can change how fast the student has to answer, but you probably should not.  The main goal of Rocket Math is for students to commit facts to memory, to be able to answer them instantly, from recall.

Recall is instantaneous, but “figuring out” is not.

The fast pace means they don’t have time to “figure out” a fact–they just have to remember it.  If they don’t remember, then the game gives them a LOT of practice on a very small number of facts, until they do remember them. That is exactly the point of the game.  We want them to stop having to “figure out” facts and just remember the answer.   If the students are not used to “recalling” facts they will think that the game is just “too fast” for them.  If they keep playing and learning, more and more facts are committed to memory and can be answered instantaneously.  Almost everyone can do it–if you insist on it.

 

The danger in slowing the game down for most students.  If you let students play at the slower speeds they may never use “recall” and instead may figure out the facts over and over.  Until I realized the difference, I allowed my students to take their time to figure out facts.  Many of my students never committed facts to memory all year long!  If, as we do in Rocket Math, you only ask them to remember two facts and their reverses at a time, everyone can remember two facts.  It takes just a few minutes to realize that they can, in fact, remember that answer instantaneously.  Once they use recall, they remember the answer in less than a second, and then three seconds to input it, is quite doable.  If you slow down the game speed, they may NEVER realize they can remember the fact, instead of figuring it out each time.

Many students may complain, but only if their difficulty score is over 3.0 do they need an adjustment made.  Students are not used to memorizing, which invariably involves repeating things over and over.  All students should expect to “Start Over” often, but some are upset by even starting over once.  Some are shocked the first time they cannot answer a problem in the 3 seconds allotted.  They don’t realize that persisting in playing will help them learn the fact fast enough to answer in 3 seconds.    Their difficulty score, from the Review Progress screen tells you whether or not the game is too fast for them.

You can sort your class based on their difficulty scores–as the teacher did in this picture.  A difficulty score under 3.0 means the student has to start over on average fewer than 3 times for each part passed.  That is not too difficult.  Some students have difficulty scores under 1.0 and Rocket Math is very easy for them.  Only students with difficulty scores over 3.0 should you consider to have their speed changed–and then only if you know they require accommodations.  On the other hand, students with difficulty scores under 0.1 should be challenged to take on the Faster speed!

Changing the Game Speed

Here’s what the game speed change looks like.

 

The options for speed are:

  • Normal, at 3 seconds to answer (double that for two digit answers)
  • Slow, at 4.5 seconds to answer per digit
  • Slowest, at 6 seconds to answer per digit
  • Fast, at 2.25 seconds to answer per digit

 

6.A.2) How owners can change Teacher Mgrs for student(s)

First, you’ll disconnect from current Teacher Mgr, then you’ll connect to a new Teacher Mgr.

NOTE: There is a button to “Update Database” that allows you to change a lot of records all at once–say at the start of a new school year.  Here is the link to the help page about the “Update Database” function.

For Individual students use the green Individual Action Button

When you want to change something for an individual student, go to the green button at the end of that student’s row that says Individual Action.”  Pull down for a short menu, outlined in green in this picture.

Step 1: First Disconnect Teacher Mgr.

Only the owner (AKA Subscription Manager) can change Teacher Mgr.  Teacher Mgrs cannot do this.  If you are the owner/subscription manager for your school you can change Teacher Mgrs for an individual student. Begin by choosing “Disconnect Teacher Mgr” from the Individual Action button.  This makes the student a sort of free agent (Teacher Name becomes n/a) so you can assign a new Teacher Mgr.

Step 2: Connect to a new Teacher Mgr.

This function is only available when a student is a free agent (when the Teacher Name is n/a) and therefore needs a Teacher Mgr. You click on it, and  this pop-up appears with a list of the available Teacher Mgrs in your account.  Choose the one you want and hit the green Connect button.

Only students who are free agents (who have n/a in the Teacher column) can be connected to a Teacher Mgr.  Be sure to “select” the students you want to connect to a new teacher.  After you have selected them go to the orange Bulk Actions button, pull down and you’ll see “Connect Teacher.”  Choose that action and a pop-up will give you the options of Teacher Mgrs in the account (see the picture).  You have to pull down to see who all is available, but then select one and hit the green “Connect” button to make it happen for all the students you had selected.

 

For groups of students use the orange “Bulk Actions” button.

First, select the students to whom the orange ‘Bulk Actions’ button will apply

When you want to change something for a group of students, you will use to the orange button on the right side above the names that say “Bulk Actions.”  You will first have to select the students to whom the bulk action should apply.  We’ll explain the functions below.

First select the students you want to affect. 

To select the students put a check mark in the little box at the left hand side of their row.  If that will be tedious, you can check the Select All box, a check mark will go onto all the students showing on your screen.

How many at a time do you want to see?  Above the word Select you can choose how many of your students you want to show at a time on your screen.  The options are: 10, 25, 50, 100 or All.

Or use the search bar to select who you want to see in your display.  You can use the search bar to limit who shows up–for example entering a teacher’s name will display only her students.  Then you can use “Select All” to put a check mark only in front of that teacher’s students.

Remember: on the Bulk Actions button somebody has to be selected (have checkmarks in front of their name) or nothing happens!

Step 1. Disconnect Teacher Mgr(s)

First select the students you want to change Teacher Mgr(s).  The first step in changing the Teacher Mgr. for a group of students is to make them  free agents.   Pull down and click on “Disconnect Teacher.”  Now the student or students are sort of a “free agent” if you will. In the place in the dashboard where it used to say the name and email of a Teacher Mgr it now says n/a.

Step 2. Connect Teacher Mgr(s)

Only students who are free agents (who have n/a in the Teacher column) can be connected to a Teacher Mgr.  Be sure to “select” the students you want to connect to a new teacher.  After you have selected them go to the orange Bulk Actions button, pull down and you’ll see “Connect Teacher.”  Choose that action and a pop-up will give you the options of Teacher Mgrs in the account (see the picture).  You have to pull down to see who all is available, but then select one and hit the green “Connect” button to make it happen for all the students you had selected.

 

6.A) How to change Learning Tracks and other things for a student on ‘Individual Action’ button

7 things (like Learning Tracks) you can change for Individual students on their green Individual Action Button

When you want to change something for an individual student, go to the green button at the end of that student’s row that says Individual Action.”  Pull down for a short menu, outlined in green in this picture.   Options include :

 

1. Change Learning Track

When the student finishes Level Z of their assigned Learning Track, you will need to change them to whatever Learning Track you want them to learn next.

Learning Track Alerts (you need this!).  You need to have an email sent to you whenever one of your student completes a Learning Track because you have to change them to a new Learning Track before they can continue playing.  You can enable Learning Track Alerts on your dashboard by clicking the orange button that says “Enable Learning Track Alerts.”  If that is already enabled you will see a red button that says “Disable Learning Track Alerts.”

 

First click on the Individual Action button at the right end of the student’s row.  When you click on “Change Learning Track” you will get the pop-up you see here which lists the Learning Tracks available.  Click on the tiny arrow at the right edge of the box to reveal your choices. Choose the one you want and then click on the green “Assign” button.

Which Learning Track should I do next?  Here is a link in these FAQs to a discussion of Learning Tracks in the Online Game.  It gives you some idea of what order you should assign Learning Tracks.  There are many options, so we leave it up to you to make the choices.

Note: Changing a Learning Track will put them back to Set A in the track they just left. Don’t change Learning Tracks based on student requests, as they really, really need to finish a Learning Track to master those facts and you don’t want them to have to start over at Set A again.

New feature! Restore Student Progress.   

In case you accidentally change a student’s Learning Track, or even “re-assign” the Learning Track, they will be put back to Set A and will be very annoyed.  Let Dr. Don know immediately with an email to don@rocketmath.com  and he can restore the student’s progress. You’ll have to tell him your email and account as well as the student’s username, but if you’re quick about it, he can get that work restored.  Won’t be possible a week later, but the next day, yes, we can restore progress.  

BEWARE OF STUDENTS WANTING TO CHANGE LEARNING TRACKS!

Students may ask you to change their Learning Track, just as soon as it gets a little hard.  They may have to start over a couple of times and if they lack much perseverance, they will want to quit. But they only learn the facts if they stick with it.  If they skip around they are going to be wasting their time.  If you assigned it, then they ought to be learning those facts.

Here is a link to a “Toughness Certificate” you can use for students who have a hard time with Rocket Math and need to be encouraged to stay the course.

Starting all over.  You can also tell students (and this is a fact) that if they leave a Learning Track, when they come back, they start over at Set A.  So they lose all they have gained by quitting before they reach Level Z.  I believe that teaching the lesson that hard work and perseverance helps you succeed, especially when you are getting discouraged, is the best thing we can do for young people.  Encourage them to stay the course.  Then celebrate mightily when they succeed!  Woo-hoo!  They are learning a great life lesson.

 

2. Erase a student.

Deletes the student, deletes his/her credentials and his/her progress records, and makes the seat available for different credentials for another student.

3. Edit a student.

So you can change that student’s username and/or password but keep the progress records.

 

4. To change Teacher Mgr. first Disconnect Teacher Mgr.

Only the owner (AKA Subscription Manager) can change Teacher Mgr.  If you are the owner/subscription manager for your school you can change Teacher Mgrs for an individual student. Begin by choosing “Disconnect Teacher Mgr” from the Individual Action button.  This makes the student a sort of free agent (Teacher Name becomes n/a) so you can assign a new Teacher Mgr.

5. Connect Teacher Mgr.

This function is only available when a student is a free agent (when the Teacher Name is n/a) and therefore needs a Teacher Mgr. You click on it, and  this pop-up appears with a list of the available Teacher Mgrs in your account.  Choose the one you want and hit the green Connect button.

Only students who are free agents (who have n/a in the Teacher column) can be connected to a Teacher Mgr.  Be sure to “select” the students you want to connect to a new teacher.  After you have selected them go to the orange Bulk Actions button, pull down and you’ll see “Connect Teacher.”  Choose that action and a pop-up will give you the options of Teacher Mgrs in the account (see the picture).  You have to pull down to see who all is available, but then select one and hit the green “Connect” button to make it happen for all the students you had selected.

NOTE: There is a button to “Update Database” that allows you to change a lot of records all at once–say at the start of a new school year.  Here is the link to the help page about the “Update Database” function.

 

6. Change Play Time–You can do it, but should you?

Our 20-minute “Battery Down” forced break is a feature not a bug!  Slamming through these facts at the rate of 3 seconds apiece (or less as they go faster) is very INTENSE.   Students will do this game for a couple of hours at a time if you let them.  But, here’s the problem.  They will only do it for a couple of days, and then they will just wear out.  They just won’t want to do it anymore. We don’t want them to lose their enthusiasm, so……. 

After five minutes of play, up comes this screen (to the left).  We say the battery is down and will need at least 20 minutes to “recharge.” The countdown timer shows the amount of time left until the student’s break is over.  The student has to take at least a 20 minute break.  We want them to do a little practice a couple of times a day, but spaced out over a month or two.  The it takes for them to get through an operation, (the longer this is spaced out) the longer they will retain the information.  And they need to know these facts for a lifetime!  So a little bit each day is far better than sitting down for long periods of time until they are sick of it.


We purposely planned for your students to end a session anxious to play again.

Yes, they may complain that they have to stop, but that ensures that they will want to come back again later.  You want them to end their sessions wanting to play more.  That’s how you can get them to play and practice, time after time, day after day until they reach Level Z.  That’s how we win and that’s how they win! before the forced break.

You can now increase play time to ten or 15 minutes, but should you?  Only if they still LOVE it! 

After years of game play lasting only five minutes at a time (under pressure from customers) Dr. Don allowed a change.  We added a feature to allow you, the parent or teacher, to adjust student play time UP to ten or even 15 minutes. The option is found under on both the orange bulk Actions button and the blue individual Action button.  

But with this freedom comes a great responsibility.   You have to make sure they are still enjoying playing! If you increase the time, you have to make sure they are not getting tired of playing!  The minute you hear a student moan or groan or complain, please move them back to 5 minutes! Seriously!! The first time anyone complains, move them back to 5 minutes.  And anyone else who does it, move them too.   They can learn just fine only working five minutes at a stretch!  

Remember, you want them to practice at home also, which they won’t do if they are getting sick of it.  You want them to practice the whole time they are assigned to do it–and they won’t do that if they aren’t motivated to keep going.  So you better be sure if you move them up to ten or fifteen minutes.   

7. Change Game Speed–You can do it, but should you? 

You can change how fast the student has to answer, but you probably should not.  The main goal of Rocket Math is for students to commit facts to memory, to be able to answer them instantly, from recall.

Recall is instantaneous, but “figuring out” is not.

The fast pace means they don’t have time to “figure out” a fact–they just have to remember it.  If they don’t remember, then the game gives them a LOT of practice on a very small number of facts, until they do remember them. That is exactly the point of the game.  We want them to stop having to “figure out” facts and just remember the answer.   If the students are not used to “recalling” facts they will think that the game is just “too fast” for them.  If they keep playing and learning, more and more facts are committed to memory and can be answered instantaneously.  Almost everyone can do it–if you insist on it.

 

The danger in slowing the game down for most students.  If you let students play at the slower speeds they may never use “recall” and instead may figure out the facts over and over.  Until I realized the difference, I allowed my students to take their time to figure out facts.  Many of my students never committed facts to memory all year long!  If, as we do in Rocket Math, you only ask them to remember two facts and their reverses at a time, everyone can remember two facts.  It takes just a few minutes to realize that they can, in fact, remember that answer instantaneously.  Once they use recall, they remember the answer in less than a second, and then three seconds to input it, is quite doable.  If you slow down the game speed, they may NEVER realize they can remember the fact, instead of figuring it out each time.

Many students may complain, but only if their difficulty score is over 3.0 do they need an adjustment made.  Students are not used to memorizing, which invariably involves repeating things over and over.  All students should expect to “Start Over” often, but some are upset by even starting over once.  Some are shocked the first time they cannot answer a problem in the 3 seconds allotted.  They don’t realize that persisting in playing will help them learn the fact fast enough to answer in 3 seconds.    Their difficulty score, from the Review Progress screen tells you whether or not the game is too fast for them.

You can sort your class based on their difficulty scores–as the teacher did in this picture.  A difficulty score under 3.0 means the student has to start over on average fewer than 3 times for each part passed.  That is not too difficult.  Some students have difficulty scores under 1.0 and Rocket Math is very easy for them.  Only students with difficulty scores over 3.0 should you consider to have their speed changed–and then only if you know they require accommodations.  On the other hand, students with difficulty scores under 0.1 should be challenged to take on the Faster speed!

 

The options for speed are:

  • Normal, at 3 seconds to answer (double that for two digit answers)
  • Slow, at 4.5 seconds to answer per digit
  • Slowest, at 6 seconds to answer per digit
  • Fast, at 2.25 seconds to answer per digit

 

6.B) How to change things for groups of students on Bulk Actions button

Bulk Actions Button for a group of students:

First, select the students to whom the orange ‘Bulk Actions’ button will apply

When you want to change something for a group of students, you will use to the orange button on the right side above the names that say “Bulk Actions.”  You will first have to select the students to whom the bulk action should apply.  We’ll explain the functions below.

First select the students you want to affect. 

To select the students put a check mark in the little box at the left hand side of their row.  If that will be tedious, you can check the Select All box, a check mark will go onto all the students showing on your screen. But be sure they are all showing before you choose this.

How many at a time do you want to see or export?  Above the word Select you can choose how many of your students you want to show at a time on your screen.  The Show entries options are: 10, 25, 50, 100 or All.

Or use the search bar to select who you want to see in your display.  You can use the search bar to limit who shows up–for example entering a teacher’s name will display only her students.  Then you can use “Select All” to put a check mark only in front of that teacher’s students.

Remember: on the Bulk Actions button somebody has to be selected (have checkmarks in front of their name) or nothing happens!

7 things you can do for a group of students on the orange ‘Bulk Actions’ button

You can hover over the Bulk Actions button to see the menu of actions you can do to a group of students.  Click on the button to choose one of the functions, outlined in orange in this picture.   Bulk Actions functions include:

1. Export progress of a group of students

Get an excel file of how they are doing.  Explained in the How to Monitor Progress FAQ.

2. Export Learning Track Summaries of a group of students

See how far each student has gone in each Learning Track they’ve worked on. Explained in the How to Monitor Progress FAQ.

5. Erase Students

Deletes the selected students, deletes their credentials and their progress records, and makes the seats available for different credentials for other students.  If this is for a new school year, you might want to use the Update Database button instead.

6. Change Play Time–You can do it, but should you?

Our 20-minute “Battery Down” forced break is a feature not a bug!  Slamming through these facts at the rate of 3 seconds apiece (or less as they go faster) is very INTENSE.   Students will do this game for a couple of hours at a time if you let them.  But, here’s the problem.  They will only do it for a couple of days, and then they will just wear out.  They just won’t want to do it anymore. We don’t want them to lose their enthusiasm, so……. 

After five minutes of play, up comes this screen (to the right).  We say the battery is down and will need at least 20 minutes to “recharge.” The countdown timer shows the amount of time left until the student’s break is over.  The student has to take at least a 20 minute break.  We want them to do a little practice a couple of times a day, but spaced out over a month or two.  The it takes for them to get through an operation, (the longer this is spaced out) the longer they will retain the information.  And they need to know these facts for a lifetime!  So a little bit each day is far better than sitting down for long periods of time until they are sick of it.


We purposely planned for your students to end a session anxious to play again.

Yes, they may complain that they have to stop, but that ensures that they will want to come back again later.  You want them to end their sessions wanting to play more.  That’s how you can get them to play and practice, time after time, day after day until they reach Level Z.  That’s how we win and that’s how they win! before the forced break.

You can now increase play time to ten or 15 minutes, but should you?  Only if they still LOVE it! 

After years of game play lasting only five minutes at a time (under pressure from customers) Dr. Don allowed a change.  We added a feature to allow you, the parent or teacher, to adjust student play time UP to ten or even 15 minutes. The option is found under on both the orange bulk Actions button and the blue individual Action button.  

But with this freedom comes a great responsibility.   You have to make sure they are still enjoying playing! If you increase the time, you have to make sure they are not getting tired of playing!  The minute you hear a student moan or groan or complain, please move them back to 5 minutes! Seriously!! The first time anyone complains, move them back to 5 minutes.  And anyone else who does it, move them too.   They can learn just fine only working five minutes at a stretch!  

Remember, you want them to practice at home also, which they won’t do if they are getting sick of it.  You want them to practice the whole time they are assigned to do it–and they won’t do that if they aren’t motivated to keep going.  So you better be sure if you move them up to ten or fifteen minutes.   

7. Change Game Speed–You can do it, but should you? 

You can change how fast the student has to answer, but you probably should not.  The main goal of Rocket Math is for students to commit facts to memory, to be able to answer them instantly, from recall.  The fast pace means they don’t have time to “figure out” a fact–they just have to remember it.  If they don’t remember, then the game gives them a LOT of practice on a very small number of facts until they do remember them.  If the students are not used to “recalling” facts they will think that the game is just “too fast” for them.  But really, almost everyone can do it.

Only if their difficulty score is over 3.0 do they need an adjustment made.  Their difficulty score, from the Review Progress screen tells you whether or not the game is too fast. You can sort your class based on their difficulty scores–as the teacher did in this picture.  You can then change the speed of play for the students with difficulty scores over 3.0.

A difficulty score under 3.0 means the student has to start over on average fewer than 3 times for each part passed.  That is not too difficult.  Some students have difficulty scores under 1.0 and Rocket Math is very easy for them.  Only students with difficulty scores over 3.0 should have their speed changed.  On the other hand, students with difficulty scores under 0.1 should be challenged to take on the Faster speed!

The options for speed are:

  • Normal, at 3 seconds to answer (double that for two digit answers)
  • Slow, at 4.5 seconds to answer per digit
  • Slowest, at 6 seconds to answer per digit
  • Fast, at 2.25 seconds to answer per digit

 

 

 

 

 

BEWARE!

Students may ask you to change their Learning Track, just as soon as it gets a little hard.  They may have to start over a couple of times and if they lack much perseverance, they will want to quit. But they only learn the facts if they stick with it.  If they skip around they are going to be wasting their time.  If you assigned it, then they ought to be learning those facts.

Here is a link to a “Toughness Certificate” you can use for students who have a hard time with Rocket Math and need to be encouraged to stay the course.

Starting all over.  You can also tell students (and this is a fact) that if they leave a Learning Track, when they come back, they start over at Set A.  So they lose all they have gained by quitting before they reach Level Z.  I believe that teaching the lesson that hard work and perseverance helps you succeed, especially when you are getting discouraged, is the best thing we can do for young people.  Encourage them to stay the course.  Then celebrate mightily when they succeed!  Woo-hoo!  They are learning a great life lesson.

6.C) Why does the session end after a few minutes of play?

This Session Completed screen is a feature, not a bug.

Slamming through these facts at the rate of 3 seconds apiece (or less as they go faster) is very INTENSE.

Students will do this game for a couple of hours at a time if you let them. But, here’s the problem.  They will only do it for a couple of days, and then they will just wear out.  They just won’t want to do it anymore.  We don’t want them to lose their enthusiasm, so…….

After five minutes of play**, up comes this screen (to the right).  Here is the script for what Mission Control says to the student:

Mission Control here. Great work, astronaut!  You have finished your session.  You are done for now.  You have worked hard and we think you deserve a break to go do something else.  You can’t do another Rocket Math session for at least an hour.  Check with your teacher or parent to find out if you are eligible to have longer sessions. Logging you and Mission Control out. 

[ ** If play time is less than five minutes, that is a technical glitch and should be reported on the green feedback button.]   

The student should take an hour break, but must take at least a 20 minute break.  If they log back in too soon they will see the battery down screen. The game will not start again until this countdown is finished.  They should log out and go do something else, rather than sit and wait for the time to end.

We want students to do a little practice a couple of times a day, but spaced out over a month or two.  The longer it takes for them to get through an operation, (the longer this is spaced out) the longer they will retain the information.  And they need to know these facts for a lifetime!  So a little bit each day is far better than sitting down for long periods of time until they are sick of it.

We purposely planned for your students to end a session anxious to play again.

Yes, they may complain that they have to stop, but that ensures that they will want to come back again later.  You want them to end their sessions just dying to play more.  That’s how you can get them to play and practice, time after time, day after day until they reach Level Z.  That’s how we win and that’s how they win!

You can Change play time to ten or 15 minutes, but should you? Only if they still LOVE it!

After years of allowing game play to last only five minutes at a time, under pressure from customers, Dr. Don allowed a change.  We added a feature to allow you, the parent or teacher, to adjust student play time UP to ten or even 15 minutes.  But with this freedom comes a great responsibility.   You have to make sure they are still enjoying playing!  If you increase the time, you have to make sure they are not getting tired of playing!  [Anecdotally, some students complained on the green feedback button the first day they had to play for ten minutes!]  The minute you hear a student moan or groan or complain, please move them back to 5 minutes! Seriously!! The first time anyone complains, move them back to 5 minutes.  And anyone else who does it, move them too.   They can learn just fine only working five minutes at a stretch!  Remember, you want them to practice at home also, which they won’t do if they are getting sick of it.  You want them to practice the whole time they are assigned to do it–and they won’t do that if they aren’t motivated to keep going.  So you better be sure if you move them up to ten or fifteen minutes.

The more students do, the more you need to motivate them.

I recommend you watch this video on Motivating Students.

The best way to motivate students, of course, is to find ways to have them share their success. You can see, in the main rainbow navigation bar, two (2) easy-to-use tools available for you, the light blue, Color in Rocket Chart and the  darker blue, Learning Track Certificates.

(1) The Color in Rocket Chart.

This chart is the same for all Learning Tracks.  You or the student need to check-off the Learning Track before they begin.  [Notice the implied, “Collect all 16!]  Students color each segment after their complete a phase such as Take-Off, Orbit or Universe.  In the game they get congratulated and the student can color in the Rocket Chart and then click the “go” button to start the next phase.  Some students may not want to stop during their few minutes of play, and they can color in whatever they have passed after the whole session has ended.  Students color in from the bottom as they finish the phases and finish the sets from A to Z.

Here’s an example of a student proudly displaying (for the teacher’s camera phone) an early version of completed Rocket Chart.  Students are proud of it because they worked hard to fill it up and because you act like it is a big deal.

 

 

 

 

 

(2) Learning Track Certificates.

The second motivational tool right there in your navigation bar is the Learning Track certificates.  We created 16 of them–a different one for each Learning Track.  We have them in grayscale (if you don’t have a color printer) and in beautiful, living color.

If you aren’t keeping track of who finishes which Learning Track you can click on the “Export Learning Track Summary” function from the orange Actions button and you’ll get a list of who got to Level Z with which Learning Tracks.

Have a ceremony every couple of weeks and award these certificates to the students who earned them.  Call them up, shake their hand (have the principal come in for this to make it really special), give them their certificate, and have them stand and receive any other students who earned certificates.  Because all your other students know they can get to Set Z, they will be motivated to do so.  Your job is to make them want to keep doing the Rocket Math game until they complete ALL the Learning Tracks.

KEEP ‘EM COMING BACK!

6.D) How to REVIEW PROGRESS (and export student progress)

Review Progress screen (default or found at top of Main Navigation bar)

(10 minute video above covers all of the below information.)

While student are playing, you can see how they are progressing without looking over their shoulder.  After students have begun playing, Review Progress will become the default screen.

  • The first column is Username.  We don’t keep PII*.

There is a list of the titles of the other 12 columns of information displaying their progress. You can hide (by unchecking the title) or display (by checking the title) any column other than the username.

  • What learning track they are currently in,
  • Login  The date they last logged in (you can tell if they played recently).

You can sort by the data in any column.  There are little up and down arrows by the title of the column.  Click to sort by that column.  As you can see in the picture, this data is sorted by PPT (parts passed today) because there is a little stack next to the down arrow.  That shows that the data is ordered going from smallest to highest.  Click again to reverse the direction.  Click on a different column to sort by that column instead.  This will be helpful for you to find the student who is logging on most often, or the student who is having the most difficult, or the student who has not logged in recently,

 

  • Latest 1-minute RACE results.  The game schedules a 1-minute RACE after Sets A, i, R, and Z.  You can think of it as a test, but we don’t want the students to.  You can also assign 1-minute races at any time.  The results of the latest 1-minute race for each student will be displayed here.  It shows as the number of problems correctly answered/the number of problems answered in one minute. You can monitor student fluency with this number.  As they move through the A to Z levels they should be developing fluency as well.  There are buttons on your dashboard that will allow you to export spreadsheets with the cumulative data of each of your students as well as your class as a whole.  But this here just gives you the latest numbers.

 

  • # of Start Overs.  When a student has three errors in any phase, Take-Off, Orbit or Universe, after they correct and practice the error, they game will take them to “Start Over.”  The student has to do that part over again, before they can pass it. [Note: Mission Control gives a bit of encouragement when they get a Start Over.] This is how the game gives the student extra practice on items where they need it.  This is equivalent to going back three problems in the Worksheet Program, or putting the missed flashcard back three items.  It is designed to give the student some extra practice where they need it.  Start-Overs are not a punishment and not a problem!  Everybody should have some Start Overs.  Some students and some facts need more practice than others, so they get more Start Overs. So what you see in progress monitoring is the number of times they had to start over. Remember, there are 24 levels with three phases for each, for a total of 78 parts.  A student who finishes with fewer than 78 Start Overs is having an easy time of it.

Note:  There is no need for you to intervene to do corrections, as the problem has already been re-taught to mastery before you even see the scores.  The game targets any problem on which there was an error or a hesitation it counts as a strike. Mission Control immediately tells them the problem and the answer and then they are required to enter the correct answer to move forward. Then in the correction mode they do two other problems and then the game presents the target problem again.  If they get it right within the time limit, the game moves out of correction mode and goes back to doing the problems in the phase they are in. 

 

  • Difficulty score.   The difficulty score tells you the number of times per phase that each student had to start over.
    • [If you sort your students based on difficulty score, you can get a display similar to what is shown here.]
    • We expect students will need to “Start Over” at least once per phase–giving them a difficulty score of 1.0.   We expect a difficulty score of between 1.0 and 3.0.
    • A difficulty score under 1.0 and it is easy for the student.  Students with scores below 1 are finding this pretty easy (they average less than one Start Over every part).
    • Student scores over 3 are having a harder time.  Watch them play to see if they have some bad habits you can help them correct.  If they are passing eventually they are learning, but they are going to need more encouragement to get there, because it is a lot harder for them.
    • Over 3.0 is hard enough you may need to slow the game play. You can adjust the speed of game play for them from Regular (3.0 seconds per answer) to Slow (4.5 seconds, or Slowest 6.0 seconds per answer).  However, students who are really tough can manage to keep learning with difficulty scores higher than 3.0.  But you should be very impressed with any student who has that much perseverance.

 

  • PP stands for Parts Passed–this is the total number of parts or phases passed so far in this Learning Track.  The column is boxed in goldenrod for this picture. Remember, there are three phases to each A-Z level, T-Take Off, O-Orbit, U-Universe so a total of 78 parts for each Learning Track.  As students finish 3 parts and complete a level it is colored goldenrod in the chart as a graphic display of their progress.

 

  • PPT stands for Parts Passed Today.  This shows in green.  The first student passed 6 parts today in this picture, which completed two levels!  But then if you look back at the calendar of logins for today, that student had 5 logins today, so the student was really working. Remember that students can only play for a few minutes at a time, so passing one or two parts is all you can expect in one login.

 

  • Sessions in the last 2 weeks.  A session is counted whenever a student plays until the battery recharge screen ends the session. This section shows a mini calendar of the last two weeks with a letter for every day: S M T W T F S.  Every day that this student completed a session there will be a number instead of a letter.  If the student did only one session, there will be a “1” showing.  You can see the numbers underlined in red for the first student.  If that student completed a second session, there will be a “2” in that spot.  A “3” or a “4” means this student is really going for gold!

 

  • Total.  This is the total of sessions that student has completed in the last two weeks.  (We just added up the numbers in the calendar for you.)  You can use this total to recognize and reward students who are really putting forth a good effort.

 

  • Current Set letter.  The unlabeled column is the current set on which the student is working.  This information is graphically displayed to the right.

How to export results of 1-minute tests races

The game collects the student scores on all the 1-minute races that students do.  The data is collected in two different spreadsheets.  One is for the “Assigned races” which are optionally assigned by the teacher.  These can be interesting and will show progress.  However, the SCHEDULED races are the most critical as they are taken by students at the same points (beginning, middle, and end) in their development, after Sets A, i, R, and Z. These will demonstrate the steady development of fluency as students put more and more facts into their memory banks!  These spreadsheets will also show the averages across the students in your class or school, which will give you an idea of where students stand in relation to norms.

How to “export” student progress and a summary of Learning Tracks.

Step 1: Select the students to whom the action will apply.

Students without a check mark by their row will not receive the intended action.  You need to put check marks in the box at the start (left hand) of the row for every student to whom you wish to apply an action.  You can choose “Select All” from the menu at the top of the column of boxes which will put a check mark in front of all the students who are SHOWING.

 

Choose how many students to show on your screen. Above the “Select All” button is a choice of how many entries to show on your screen.  It defaults to showing 50 or 100.  Choose Show All entries if you want to see or export the data from all the students in your account.

Step 2: Go to the orange Bulk Actions button.

With the students selected, find the orange Bulk Actions button (above the names) and pull down for a the menu of Actions that can be applied to all the selected students.

Step 3: Choose your Actions

You may choose between Export Progress and Export Learning Track Summary explained below on this page. Also available are Disconnect and Connect Teacher Mgr [explained in 6A of the Help menu]  which are used to change Teacher Mgr.  You can erase students in bulk if you need to.  Finally you can change the amount of play time, which is explained in 6B of the Help menu.

Export Progress

If you choose the Export Progress (with the students selected) a file will download on your computer, wherever your browser puts downloaded files.  This is an excel type file and will open with whatever your computer chooses to open it with.

Looks like this one.  But then you can share with whomever, or take it home to peruse over with your favorite beverage.  Same information as noted above in Review Progress.

Remember, the system will export the data for all the students selected.  However, only the first 100 students are displayed and selected on the first page.  You have to go to the bottom of the list and go to the other pages. (See above.)  Once there the students on that page will be selected and you can export their data.

Export Learning Track Summary.

You can also select “Export Learning Track Summary” in the pull down menu.  The system is collecting data on student progress in all Learning Tracks they complete.  You will know which Learning Tracks each student completed during the year, as well as what level they completed on each Learning Track when they left it.

Here is an example of an exported Learning Track Summary (except that I drew all over it so you can notice students are duplicated for Learning Tracks they finished as well as ones that they are in the process of learning).

Students who have worked on more than one Learning Track will have a separate row for each Learning Track they have worked in. You can see a row or rows for what they have finished and then a row for the Learning Track they are in the process of doing.  Next to the name of the Learning Track will be the start date, the end date (or the most current date) and the highest level they have completed.  If it shows Level Z you know they finished that level.  Under that should be the Learning Track that is in process and the level they are in when you exported the data.  If there’s nothing by that student you know that is what they have done in the game–nothing!  The really active students will have several rows for the several Learning Tracks they have worked on.

*PII–Personally Identifiable Information

6.G) Report technical glitches on green feedback button

On the extreme right hand edge of your screen is the green feedback button for reporting technical glitches directly to the tech team.

 

If you or your students get something technically weird, please use the green feedback button on the right hand edge of your screen to report glitches directly to the technical experts.  If your students tell you about glitches, but aren’t old enough to do this process yourself, please log into their account and see if you can duplicate their problem.  If you can, then report it yourself immediately on the green feedback button.

It is impossible to fix a problem we only hear stories about.  The green feedback button allows you to send us a picture of the problem as well as the information about what device and browser is experiencing it.  This information is essential for tracking down the problem. Thanks for your help!

6.F) See (and export) improved fluency with 1-minute RACE

The results of the 1-minute tests races prove that your students are building fluency.

We have a feature that demonstrates that students are developing fluency while doing a Learning Track. We call it a “1-minute RACE.”

As with all good progress monitoring measures, the 1-minute tests races present a random selection of ALL the facts in the Learning Track even the ones they have not yet worked to memorize.  Students are allowed and encouraged to “hit the checkmark” and skip any problems they don’t know, or they can take the time to “figure out” any facts they have not yet memorized, which they should be able to do before they begin memorization.  As they memorize more facts they will be able to answer more in one minute and that will prove that they are learning and developing fluency.  Click this link to hear the directions that play for the students every time they do one of these 1-minute races.

Here’s what the students experience.

The results are shown as the number of problems answered correctly in one minute over the total problems presented. (Some might be skipped or answered incorrectly.)  Students will get more fluent with the facts in their Learning Track as they work through.  So we want to see how they are doing at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end.  Therefore we have automatically scheduled races.

A 1-minute RACE is automatically SCHEDULED for all students after they finish Sets A, i, R, and Z.

Here are the average results from our whole site as of November 2020 for those scheduled races.

See your students latest results in this column on the Review Progress screen!

At any time, you can also Assign a Fluency Test 1-Minute RACE “on next login.”

1) Select the students to whom you want to assign the test RACE, or Select All.

2) Click on the orange Bulk Action button.

3) Pull down to “Assign 1-min RACE on next login.”

 

 

After doing that, in your dashboard you will see that the 1-minute race has been assigned on the next login. 
The next time those students login, they will be given the mission of doing a 1-minute race with ALL the facts in the Learning Track they are studying. They can skip facts they don’t know, by hitting the checkmark.

Assign a 1-minute RACE individually also–at any time you wish.

You can assign a 1-minute RACE at any time for specific individuals as well, using the green Individual Action button at the end of their row.

 

  • Export the test results in different spreadsheets for the Assigned and the Scheduled races. 

    • Separate exports for results from RACEs you Assign from the RACEs that are Scheduled after working through some levels in the Online Game (After sets A, i, R, and Z).

See averages across your class or school. 

    • Each spreadsheet will show the average for your class as a teacher or for the school in the account of the Subscription Manager or owner.  There are separate averages for each Learning Track.
  • See trends over time. Here’s an example of the Scheduled Races for one school.

    • You’ll see the improvement each student makes from the beginning after Set A to each of the subsequent tests RACES.  The top row gives the account (school or class) average for each Learning Track and after each set.  You can see the class average in the Addition Learning Track is 6 correctly answered of 7 presented after Set A, but by Set Z the class average was 20 correct in one minute out of 24 presented.

As always, we’re here to help if you get stuck. Email Dr Don at don@rocketmath.com   If you get something technically weird, please use the green feedback button on the right hand edge of your screen to report glitches directly to the technical experts.

6.E) Update Database-preparing for new semester or year

Using the Update Database button to make a lot of changes (such as new teacher(s) or start of new year) all at once.

We have a feature that will allow you to change or “update” your database to change Teacher Mgrs and or Learning Tracks for all or most of your students all at once.  See the teal button (pictured to the right) on your dashboard that says “Update database.”

This update can only be done from within the owner or Subscription Manager’s account.

 

This will enable you to update as many Teacher Mgrs or Learning Tracks as you want with one import.  Handy for starting the new school year!   When you click on the Update Database button you’ll see the pop-up. pictured below, that tells you what to do, but we’ll cover it anyway.

 

You start by hitting “Click here” to get an up-to-date file of all the student logins in your account.  (Hopefully, you do this when no one is around making changes in the student logins or Learning Tracks while you are doing this.)

Change this file to update your database. 

You can then make changes in this file as you want.  You can change the number of the Learning Track for students to a different code.  You can change the Teacher Mgrs by putting in the email address of a different Teacher Mgr (who is already in your account).  You can delete the logins of students who are no longer with you.  You can add new student logins.  You can do these changes but leave the username and password intact for existing students, so they can login as they did before.  This will also retain their progress and the record of the Learning Tracks they have completed.

Save As CSV (Comma delimited)

Now for the hard part.  After making changes, save the file with a new name but choose SAVE AS and pick CSV (comma delimited) as the file type.  This is the only way it will import.  You can save as Comma Delimited from a Mac if you save it in Google first, then save as Comma Delimited.  Be sure to rename so you know which is the new file!

 

Now you are ready to import it back again.  Click on the Update Database button.  See the choose file box, and browse to find the new file you just created.  Then click on the blue button to Parse File and it should all happen for you.  You will immediately (well, almost immediately) get a report on this pop-up telling you of any problems.  You may have some rows that will not import because of issues.  You can fix those and re-import the whole file.

As always, we’re here to help if you get stuck. Email Dr Don at don@rocketmath.com   If you get something technically weird, please use the green feedback button on the right hand edge of your screen to report glitches directly to the technical experts.