Beginning numerals and counting program added to Rocket Math

Beginning Numerals and Counting

Dr. Don has created another math program and put it into the Universal level virtual filing cabinet at Rocket Math.  This is a beginning program for kindergarten students.  That means they can’t learn on their own, the teacher must provide instruction.  Teachers can use the worksheets to effectively teach students to count objects aloud and then match the word with the numeral. You can see the top half of Worksheet A here.

I do–demonstration of counting.

Each worksheet begins with a demonstration of counting objects and circling the numeral that matches.  On Worksheet A there are only the numerals two and three to learn.  The teacher demonstrates (best with a document camera so all students can see) how she counts the objects and then points out that the answer is circled. Suggested teaching language is something like this,

“I can do these. Watch me count the frogs. One, two, three.  There are three frogs in this box. So they circled the three. Everybody, touch here where the three is circled. Good.
How many frogs were in this box, everybody? Yes, three.
Now watch me do the next box.”

We do–counting together. 

In the “We do” portion of the worksheet the teacher counts the stars first as a demo and then with the students.  Worksheet A you all just count 3 stars.  Suggested teaching language is something like this:

“Our ‘We Do’ says to touch and count. Start at zero and count each star.
We are going to touch and count the stars. Put your counting finger on zero,
everybody. We are going to start at zero and count each star. Let’s count.
One, two, three. We counted three stars. That was great!
Let’s do it again! Fingers on zero, everybody. Let’s count. One…”

By Worksheet S the teacher and the students are  counting 12 stars together.

The program has a page of teacher directions, with suggested language for teaching the worksheets.

You do–independent counting. 

In the “You do” portion of the worksheet (after learning the numerals with the teacher), the students are asked to count the items in each box and circle the correct number.  They are not asked to form the numerals–that’s numeral writing skill.  They just identify the numeral and circle it. Besides cute items there are also dice to count, fingers to count and hash marks to count–so students can learn multiple ways of keeping track of numbers.

Passing a level requires 100% accuracy.  Students who make any errors should be worked with until they can complete the worksheet independently and get all the items correct.

This Beginning numerals program will build strong beginning math skills for kindergarten students learning the meaning of numerals.  Combined with Rocket Writing for Numerals it will set students up for success in elementary math.

 

 

Math Worksheets for Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th grade+

Rocket Math worksheets are a great way to teach math facts to children of all ages – starting as early as Kindergarten when students begin learning how to read and write numbers. The Rocket Math Universal Worksheet Program is designed for daily practice in order to build a solid foundation of basic math skills.

Our Universal Worksheet Program follows a simple structure and routine to help students progress at an appropriate rate throughout their different grade levels. Throughout the sequence, students learn all of the building blocks necessary to succeed throughout elementary and middle school.

If you have students that are behind for their grade level, our worksheet program makes it easy for you to revisit previous lessons that will reinforce the concepts that are necessary to move forward. Likewise, there are plenty of supplemental worksheets within the program to keep advanced students engaged.

Kindergarten Math Worksheets

math worksheet for kindergartenerskindergarten math worksheets

The first math-related goal for Kindergarteners should be to learn how to write numerals. It is important for children to learn the most efficient way to write numerals. Think about it – how do you write the number eight? Where does your pen begin on the page?

Believe it or not, this is something that is learned and becomes second nature.  This skill is important to develop early on as the first building block to learning math.  

Rocket Writing for Numerals is a 72-page program for students to learn how to write the numerals efficiently.  It proceeds from how to write numerals and goes until they can write 40 digits in a minute. It is part of the Rocket Math Universal Worksheet Program and is designed to be practiced on a daily basis.

1st Grade Math Worksheets

1st grade math worksheet

If children in first grade cannot write numerals legibly and efficiently, they should begin the year with Rocket Writing for Numerals. Once they understand the concept of addition, first graders are ready to begin memorizing addition facts.  

The Rocket Math Worksheet Program includes Addition 1s through 9s.  Students work through 26 levels (A to Z) learning two facts and their reverses on each level.  They practice orally for 2 minutes with a partner who corrects any hesitations or errors.

math worksheet for first graders

Alternatively, once students have learned the concepts for both addition and subtraction, they can begin to learn Fact Families. Our Fact Families 1 to 10 Add and Subtract worksheet program begins teaching fact families. Set D of this worksheet to the right is an example, teaching four related math facts such as 3+2, 2+3, 5-2, and 5-3.

Common Core suggests that students be fluent with addition facts up to 20, such as 13+6=19. Personally, I think if a student knows 3+6=9, they don’t need to practice 13+6.  However, Rocket Math has made available a program for these facts, Add to 20 in the Universal subscription.

Rocket Math makes it easy for teachers, as the consistent structure provides an easy daily routine for students in all programs and levels. Because the Rocket Math Worksheet program follows a sequence and routine, it is easy for students to continue working together even when studying different programs or levels.

2nd Grade Math Worksheets

Upon starting second grade, students should have mastered all of their addition facts, or fact families 1 to 10. If they have not mastered those facts, you should begin with the first-grade worksheets (Addition 1s through 9s/Fact Families 1 to 10 Add and Subtract) until they are ready to move forward.

second grade math worksheetThe goal for second graders is to learn subtraction (and addition facts) by the end of the year.  Rocket Math has a Worksheet Program for Subtraction 1s through 9s that is perfect for second grade.  If students master the subtraction facts through practicing with Rocket Math they will be able to learn the lessons of re-grouping, a.k.a “borrowing”, much more easily.

math worksheet for second gradersIf students have been using the Fact Families Program, it is best to continue using that sequence. Second graders should be ready for Fact Families 11 to 18 Add & Subtract. The last ten levels of this program review all the fact families so that students will be quite solid in their mastery by the time they reach Level Z. 

 

 

best math worksheets for second grade students

For second-grade students who have mastered addition and subtraction facts, skip counting is a great next step. Skip counting is easy and fun for students while preparing them for multiplication in third grade.  

Rocket Math’s Skip Counting program is a uniquely designed worksheet. When students are practicing together, the checker has to rotate the paper to keep up as the other is quickly skip counting.

Because of that, students especially enjoy this worksheet. Not to mention, the design incorporated playful Rocket graphics, which causes it to resemble a game rather than a math worksheet!

Common Core suggests that students be fluent with subtraction facts up to 20, such as 19-6=13. Personally, I think if a student knows 9-6=3, they don’t need to practice 19-6.  However, Rocket Math has made available a program, Subtract from 20, so students can practice these facts.

 

 3rd Grade Math Worksheets

third grade math worksheet

The priority for third grade is to learn multiplication. Textbooks begin teaching the concept of multiplication from very early in 3rd grade.  Your goal should be to introduce multiplication facts by the time the textbook is giving students multiplication problems to solve.

Using the Rocket Math Skip Counting worksheet can help ease students into learning multiplication facts. If possible the Skip Counting worksheet should be used before students are asked to start performing a lot of multiplication.

math worksheet for third grade

The first step to successfully teaching multiplication facts is teaching memorization. The Rocket Math Multiplication 1s to 9s is designed to build strong multiplication fact fluency and recall. This technique avoids the problem of students having to look up facts in times tables, over and over again.

Achieving mastery in multiplication facts is the only way for students to keep up in math throughout elementary and middle school. Even if students come to you without having a solid foundation of addition and subtraction, it is crucial that you teach mastery in multiplication.

For quick-learning students, who get through Multiplication 1s through 9s before the end of the year, a good supplemental Worksheet Program is Multiplication 10s, 11s, 12s.  Building upon the facts from Multiplication 1s to 9s, students progress easily through this next set of facts.  And of course, students consider it a badge of honor to be members of the “tens, elevens, and twelves” club!

 

 

4th Grade Math Worksheets

fourthgrade math worksheet

By the end of fourth grade, students should have learned all four basic operations of math facts. Fourth graders should be using then Division 1s through 9s worksheet to learn division facts.  

While division facts are derived from multiplication, it is very valuable for students to explicitly learn the division facts. Long division comes much easier for students who have learned division facts.

For students who get all the way through Level Z in basic division, there is a supplemental program: Division 10s, 11s, 12s.  It builds upon and reviews facts from Division 1s to 9s while keeping learning fun for students who work faster.

 

 

Math Worksheets for 5th grade and up

Students who have been learning math facts since kindergarten have built a great foundation by the time they reach fifth grade.  Unfortunately, this is not the case for many students, which makes it difficult for teachers to create lessons suitable for everyone’s level.

Rocket Math provides an easy solution for these teachers. Simply take ten minutes a day utilizing the worksheet program to teach the four basic operations. While these students are catching up, the remaining students can do Rocket Math as well!

We offer five programs that teach more advanced math skills that follow the same structure and routine. Each one of these five different programs includes video lessons that teach students both how to use the program and how to do the skill that is being introduced.

advanced math worksheet1) Equivalent Fractions

  • Teaches 100 fractions and what they are equivalent to.

2) Factors

  • Shows how to find all the factors of a number, quickly and reliably.

3) Learning to Add Integers (positive and negative numbers)

  • Uses a vertical number line to teach these problems.

4) Learning to Subtract Integers (positive and negative numbers)

  • Uses the vertical number line to show how these work.

math worksheet for fast learners5) Mixed Integers (adding and subtracting positive and negative numbers)

  • Uses the same vertical number lines but now mixes the 8 types of problems together.

 

Rocket Math’s goal is to make learning fun for everyone – students and teachers. By following the worksheet program, even students who have struggled in the past can begin gaining confidence in their math skills.

With the right tools, students can enjoy learning math and teachers can relax knowing that a strong foundation is being built. Our FAQs page for Teacher Instructions and How to Implement the Worksheet program can help answer any questions you might have.

Testing season activities: 5 Reasons to Use Rocket Math During Testing Gaps

Testing season is stressful.  The task of scheduling testing for each student in the school is difficult.  It causes significant stress due to time logistics, student absences, and disrupted schedules. Teachers know how difficult it can be to deal with odd and awkward time gaps.   What testing season activities can fill those holes?

Teachers spend a lot of time juggling schedule and testing material.  Students are anxious about the tests as well.  Often the mood in the classroom can feel tense.

We at Rocket Math are concerned about the success of students. We know how precious teaching time is. We believe that doing Rocket Math practice sessions can significantly aid during the busy spring test season.  Here are five reasons why doing Rocket Math is a great activity during testing season.

1. Rocket Math is a time efficient testing season activity.

Your students are familiar with the Rocket Math routine.  They know just what to do. The process of doing Rocket Math from start to finish should take no longer than ten to fifteen minutes. When you have one of those short intervals created by the testing schedule, you can make good use of this short amount of time. Rocket Math fits in a short amount of time and is still productive.

2. Rocket Math can be used during multiple testing season gaps.

As test schedules tend to have multiple gaps, Rocket Math works great as an activity that can be used multiple times throughout the day without causing extra work for teachers. Students actually appreciate the opportunity to have another chance to practice Rocket Math in the same day.

Students can easily use Rocket Math a second or third time during their school day without any negative impact. In fact, multiple sessions of Rocket Math during a single day can help students progress faster.

3. Rocket Math is a testing season activity that doesn’t require re-teaching lessons.

As students are taking make-up tests, the rest of their classmates need something to do in the classroom. Because students work in pairs during Rocket Math allows students to work through math lessons on their own.  Because it is just practice, there is no need to re-teach material, students taking their make up tests filter back into the classroom.

As long as there is at least a 15-minute gap between testing sessions, students can easily complete a Rocket Math session. The best part is, because students are familiar with the Rocket Math process, teachers don’t need to explain a new activity to each student who filters in after testing.

4. Rocket Math is a highly engaging and productive testing season activity.

Many teachers struggle to fill time in the gaps between test sessions. Reading time or make-up work is often the go-to solution.   Teachers know that these activities don’t seem productive or engaging.  Plus, students know that these time-filling activities “don’t count.”  Rocket Math however, does count!

In contrast, Rocket Math offers students a fun and creative way to effectively learn critical skills that are necessary for future success.

5. Rocket Math is a testing season activity that students truly enjoy.

Accountability tests can cause stress due to unfamiliarity, whereas Rocket Math offers students comfort in an activity that they know and enjoy.  As Rocket Math shows progress along the way, each student gains a sense of pride in their accomplishment and is more likely to feel motivated to continue learning.

When there are gaps between test sessions, Rocket Math can provide students a boost of confidence as they are instantly gratified by their success.

During this busy spring test time, I highly recommend teachers are prepared with their Rocket Math folders to help productively fill the time gaps left in the daily schedule. Rocket Math is a quick and easy testing season activity.  It can be used during multiple gaps as an engaging learning tool.  Doing Rocket Math helps students feel accomplished in an otherwise stressful testing period.

In What Order Should Students Learn Fast Math Facts?

Basic, Optional, and Alternative—there are a lot of different Rocket Math programs. But which program should you use first? And in what order should you teach fast math facts? Well, it all depends on the grade you teach and the fast math facts your students have already memorized.

An overview of Rocket Math’s fast math fact programs

Rocket Math program sequence description for teaching fast math factsRocket Math offers multiple programs because their are several ways to teach fast math facts.

The Basic Program

Rocket Math’s basic program includes Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division (1s-9s). The basic program must be mastered by all students.

The Alternative Program: Fact Families

There is another way to learn facts, which is called Fact Family math.  Instead of learning all Addition facts, students can learn Addition and Subtraction facts at the same time.  A fact family consists of four related facts, for example: 3+2 = 5, 2 + 3 = 5, 5 – 3 = 2, 5 – 2 = 3.  As an alternative to using the Basic Program, students can learn fact families up to 10 in first grade.  Then students can move on to the upper fact families 11 to 18 in second grade.  There is no clear evidence that this way is better or the separate operations way is better.  That’s why we offer both options.

Optional Programs

The rest of the fast math facts programs like Rocket Writing for Numerals or Skip Counting are optional. You should only offer these programs to students once they have memorized the fast math facts through the Basic Program or the Alternative Program.

The only exception would be in a school where Kindergarteners did not get a chance to learn how to quickly and easily write numerals. In that case, you might take the first two months of the first grade year to run students through Rocket Writing for Numerals before beginning Addition (1s-9s).

Here’s a link to a printable version of the different Rocket Math programs shown in the graphic above.

Let’s take a closer look at how to implement each program in different grade levels.

First grade math facts: Learn Addition

Rocket Math fast math facts programs for first graders include:

  • The Basic Program
    • (1s-9s) Addition
  • The Alternative Program
    • Fact Families (1-10) Add & Subtract
  • Optional Programs
    • Rocket Writing for Numerals
    • Add to 20

If first grade students are taking all year to get through sets A-Z in Addition in the Basic Program, they need some extra help.  You should intervene to help students who take more than a week to pass a level.  Often they need to practice better or practice with a better partner.  Some may need to practice a second time during the day or at home in the evening.  First grade students who finish the 1s-9s can move on to the Add to 20 Optional Program for the remainder of the year.

Likewise, if you choose to teach Fact Families (1-10) Add & Subtract from the Alternative Program instead of using the Basic Program, your students can use the Optional Programs for supplemental learning purposes.

Second grade math facts: Learn Addition and Subtraction

Rocket Math fast math facts programs for second graders include:

  • The Basic Program
    • (1s-9s) Addition
    • (1s-9s) Subtraction
  • The Alternative Program
    • Fact Families (1-10) Add & Subtract
    • Fact Families Part Two (11-18) Add & Subtract
  • Optional Programs
    • Subtract from 20
    • Skip Counting

Second grade students must have completed Addition before starting on Subtraction (1s-9s).  They can also test out of Addition through the Placement Probes.  Second graders who cannot test out of Addition in first grade or didn’t complete it in first grade must focus on Addition.  Only after getting through Set Z of Addition should they move into Subtraction.

You can substitute the Basic Program’s (1s-9s) Addition and (1s-9s) Subtraction for the Alternative Program’s Fact Families (1-10) Add & Subtract and Fact Families Part Two (11-18) Add & Subtract.

Second grade students who complete Addition and Subtraction 1s-9s (or the Alternative Program) can move on to Subtract from 20.  Students who finish Subtract from 20 can do Skip Counting, which does a great job of preparing students to learn Multiplication facts.

Third grade math facts: Learn Multiplication

There aren’t any Alternative Programs available for third graders from Rocket Math. There are only Basic and Optional Programs. These include:

  • The Basic Program
    • (1s-9s) Multiplication (priority)
    • (1s-9s) Addition
    • (1s-9s) Subtraction
  • Optional Programs
    • 10s, 11s, 12s Multiplication
    • Factors

In third grade, Multiplication has priority—even if students have not mastered Addition and Subtraction.  Multiplication facts are so integral to the rest of higher math that students are even more crippled without Multiplication facts than they are having to count Addition and Subtraction problems on their fingers.  So do Multiplication first. Then, if there’s time, students who need to do so can go back and master Addition and Subtraction.  Once all three of these basic operations are under their belts, students can go on to 10s, 11s, 12s in Multiplication (one of the Optional Programs).  If students successfully progress through each program and there is enough time left in the school year, introduce the Factors program next.

Fourth grade math facts: Learn Multiplication and Division

Like the programs for third graders, there aren’t any Alternative Programs available for fourth graders. There are only Basic and Optional Programs, which include:

  • The Basic Program
    • (1s-9s) Multiplication (priority)
    • (1s-9s) Division (second priority)
  • Optional Programs
    • 10s, 11s, 12s Multiplication
    • Factors

In fourth grade, students need to have completed Multiplication before going on to Division. If they complete Division, they can go on to 10s, 11s, 12s Division, followed by Factors, and then equivalent fractions (shown in the fifth grade section below).

Fifth grade math facts: Learn all basic operations first, then they can branch out

By fifth grade, students should have completed all four basic operations (1s-9s) within the Basic Program (or the Alternative Program for grades one and two).  If students have not completed these basics (and cannot test out of them with the Placement Probes) then the sequence they should follow is Multiplication, followed by Division, then go back and complete Addition followed by Subtraction.  The same recommendations hold for students in any grade after fifth.

Once students have mastered the basics (1s-9s add, subtract, multiply, divide), the supplemental pre-algebra programs are recommended.  These will help more than learning the 10s, 11s, 12s facts.  I would recommend this order:

  1. Factors
  2. Equivalent Fractions
  3. Learning to Add Integers
  4. Learning to Subtract Integers or Mixed Integers

How to Grade 1-Minute Math Fluency Practice Tests

Katy L from Wilson Elementary asks: How can I keep up with everyday Rocket Math grading? Do you teach students to grade their own 1-minute math fluency practice tests?

Dr. Don answers:

Only grade 1-minute math fluency practice tests if students pass

An integral part of the Rocket Math Worksheet Program is the 1-minute math fluency practice test. One-minute fluency practice tests are administered every day, to the whole class, and only after students practice in pairs for two to three minutes each. Check out the FAQs page to learn more about conducting 1-minute math fluency practice tests in class.

Teachers do NOT need to grade, score, or check daily Rocket Math 1-minute math fluency practice tests unless the student has met their goal. Students do NOT need to grade their own daily Rocket Math fact fluency tests either.

Why grading each math test is not important

The important part of math fluency practice is the oral practice with the partner before the test–what’s going on in this picture. Because the students are orally practicing every day and getting corrections from their partners, there should be VERY FEW errors on the 1-minute math fluency written tests.  

Correcting written tests doesn’t help students learn anyway. Corrections are only helpful if they are immediate, the student has to acknowledge the correct answer, and remember it for a few seconds–all of which is part of the oral correction procedure. “Correcting” what’s on the paper takes a lot of time and does not help students learn more, so it shouldn’t be done. But you have to check them before declaring that the student has passed a level.

How do you know if a student passes?

Students should have a packet of 6 sheets math fact fluency sheets at their level. Each Rocket Math student has an individual goal. For example, if a student has a goal of 32 (based on their Writing Speed Test) and they only do 31, they know they did not pass. If the student does 32 or more, they pass!

What to do when a student beats their goal (passes)

If a student meets or beats their goal, then have them stand up, take a bow, and then turn their folder into a place where you check to see that all problems were answered correctly. When YOU check (after school?), make sure all of the completed problems were correct and the student met their goal. If so, then you put the unused sheets in that packet back into the filing crate and re-fill the student’s folder with a packet of 6 worksheets at the next level and hand the folder back the next day.

When students receive the new packet of worksheets, they know to color in another letter on the Rocket Chart (and maybe put a star on the Wall Chart).

What to do if a student doesn’t pass?

Students who don’t meet their goals, don’t pass. These students should put the non-passing sheet into their backpacks and take the sheet home for more practice.

The next day they will use the next sheet in their packet of 6. If you want to give them points, do that the next day after they bring back their worksheet where they did a session at home (signature of helper should be there) and all items on the test are completed. If that’s done, they get full points.

Sometimes you’ll catch errors on sheets that students turn in as “passes.” If you see an error, the student doesn’t pass. As a result, the student keeps the old packet and has to continue with that same level worksheet.

For more information about conducting 1-minute math fluency practice tests in class and how to implement the Rocket Math worksheet program, visit the FAQs page.

Adding Teacher Managers to Online Game

The person who first sets up the account is the owner (probably you).
The owner is automatically the first teacher.
 
Next, if you need help, you can set up additional teachers and give them subscriptions.
Go to the Teacher Mgr page by clicking on the Teacher Managers link in the left hand navigation.
Then click the blue Add Teacher Mgr button in the upper right.
You’ll see this dialog box (below) in which you enter the name and email. Don’t worry if you give them the wrong number of subscriptions.  When you enter the csv file with the student logins, there is a place to enter the teacher for each student.  The system will increase the number of subscriptions given to each teacher if necessary to accommodate what is in the csv file.
When you hit the green “Create” button the system will create a password for that teacher and email it to the email you entered for them.  It’s a hard password, so they might want to change it.
Don’t wait too long to let the teacher know about the incoming information or they’ll miss the email and won’t know how to enter the system.
Repeat as needed to add more Teacher Mgrs to help you monitor students.
Next, you will go on to assign student login information to your “unassigned” subscriptions so the students can login and play.

Choose a Learning Track for Online Game

Choose from ten Learning Tracks

In the Rocket Math Online Game every student needs to be started in one of the ten Learning Tracks.  A student’s Learning Track can be changed at any time**, but one must be chosen to begin with.

If you are entering the Student Login individually, you can use the pull down menu to select a learning track, as illustrated to the right.

The ten learning tracks are numbered as follows. If you are using the csv method of entry you’ll need to enter the number for the track.

  1. Addition 1s through 9s
  2. Subtraction 1s through 9s
  3. Multiplication 1s through 9s
  4. Division 1s through 9s
  5. Fact Familes (1 to 10) add and subtract, ex.4+5, 5+4, 9-4, 9-5
  6. Fact Families (11 to 18) add and subtract, ex. 8+7, 7+8, 15+7, 15-8
  7. Add to 20, example 13+4, 4+13,
  8. Subtract from 20, example 15-3, 15-12,
  9. Multiplication 10s-11s-12s,
  10. Division 10s-11s-12s.

You can click below to see a google document showing all the problems learned in each of the Learning Tracks.

Click to see the problems in the tracks.

Considerations, or what to choose when?

Begin with the basics.  The four basic operations are most important and typical expectations is one of those per grade level, so Addition in first, Addition then Subtraction in second, Multiplication, then go back to Addition and Subtraction in third, and Multiplication then Division in fourth grade, and then going back to get Addition and Subtraction if those haven’t been learned.  Make sure your student have worked through the expected basic operations for their grade level BEFORE doing any of the other optional Learning Tracks.

Another way to learn basic Addition and Subtraction Facts.  Learning in Fact Families is another order to learn. Fact Familes (1 to 10) add and subtract would be chosen in first grade.   Fact Families (11 to 18) add and subtract would be mastered in second grade.  You can choose this sequence instead of the basic addition and basic subtraction fact Learning Tracks.   Optionally, Fact Families is also a good way to review for students who have already learned the basic addition and subtraction facts in first or second grade.

Optional Learning Tracks. Add to 20 and Subtract from 20 are additional problems that the Common Core feels should be committed to memory.  They are composed of facts you can figure out if you know the basic 1s through 9s facts, but can be learned AFTER the basics are learned, if there is time in first or second grade.  They should not be assigned until after the student has mastered the basic 1s through 9s addition and subtraction facts.

After students learn the basic 1s through 9s multiplication facts, if there is time, they can move on to 10s, 11s, 12s.  After basic 1s through 9s  division facts are learned (and all the other basic operations are learned) then the 10s, 11s, and 12s are a good use of time.

 

**See “How to change Learning Tracks” in the FAQs and Directions document.

Intervention Tip: Have students practice test

Sometimes students need to review test problems also.

You know that there is a difference between the test problems and the practice problems, right?  The problems practiced around the outside are the recently introduced facts.  The problems inside the test box are an even mix of all the problems taught so far.  Sometimes students have forgotten some of the older facts.  For example, if there has been a break for a week or more, or if the student has been stuck for a couple of weeks, the student may have forgotten some of the facts from earlier and may need a review of the test problems.

How you could diagnose for this problem.  Have the student practice orally on the test problems inside the box with you.  If the student hesitates on several of the problems that aren’t on the outside practice, then the student needs to review the test items.

Solution. If you have this problem with quite a few students (for example after summer break or after Christmas break) then have the whole class do this solution.  For the next week, after practicing around the outside, instead of taking the 1 minute test in writing, have students practice the test problems orally with each other.  Use the same procedures as during the practice—two or three minutes with answer keys for the test, saying the problem and the answer aloud, correction procedures for hesitations, correct by saying the problem and answer three times, then going back—then switch roles.   Do this for a week and then give the one-minute test.   Just about everyone should pass at that point.

Solution.  If you have this problem with a handful of students, find a time during the day for them to practice the test problems orally in pairs.  If the practice occurs before doing Rocket Math so much the better, but it will work if done after as well.  They should keep doing this until they pass a couple of levels within six days.

If neither the first or the second solutions seem to work, write to me again and I’ll give you some more ideas.

Why give the Two-Minute timings in Rocket Math?

To prove whether students are making progress in learning math facts.

First of all, understand that the two-minute timings are NOT a teaching tool.  They are an assessment tool only.  Giving a two-minute timing of all the facts in an operation every week or two allows you to graph student performance.  You graph student performance to see if it is improving.  If the graph is going up, as in the picture above, then the student is learning.   If the graph is flat, then the student is not really learning.

The individual graphs should be colored in by students allowing them to savor the evidence of their learning.  The graphs should be shared with parents at conference time to prove that students are learning.  

Progress monitoring with two-minute tests are a curriculum-free method of evaluating a curriculum.  If you use the same tests you can compare two methods of learning facts to see which one causes faster growth.  This makes for a valid research study.

This kind of progress monitoring over time is also used in IEPs.  You can draw an aimline from the starting performance on the two-minute timing to the level you expect the student to achieve by the end of the year.  (Note the writing speed test gave you goals for the two-minute timing which you could use for your end-of-year goal.) The aimline on the graph, when it crosses the ending date of each quarter, will provide quarterly objectives that will enable quarterly evaluation of progress–required for an IEP.

These two minute timings are a scientifically valid method of proving whether students are learning math facts, in the same way that tests of oral reading fluency prove whether students are learning to read.  They can be used to prove to a principal or a curriculum director, for example, that Rocket Math is working and is worth the time, paper and money it requires.