How to reset your Rocket Math password

Four steps to get back into your account with a new password

There are 4 steps to get logged in if you haven’t done so since August 2017, or if your password doesn’t seem to work.  We have changed the look and location of the login screen.  You can access it from the top of the Rocket Math home page.

Step 1: Get to the login screen and click on “Reset Password.” 

You can click on “Teacher’s Subscription” on the blue bar, or hover and pull down to “Login,” or click on “Subscriber Account” on the orange bar.  All of them will take you to the “Login to your Account”  screen pictured here. (We had to change everyone’s password in August with the new system, so your old password won’t work, so step one is to change it.)
 The good news is all you have to do is click on Reset Password and it will take you to a screen where you can request a Password Recovery email.
P.S. You don’t even have to enter your email address on this screen–but you probably already did, so don’t worry about it.
  

Step 2: Request a password reset.


The Reset Password request asks you to tell the system where to send the Password Recovery email.  So fill in that box with your email address and then hit the button “Send me the Password Recovery email.”

 

 

 

Step 3: Open the email and Reset your Password.

Look for and open the Rocket Math: Password Recovery email.
You’ll get (pretty much instantly, so you don’t have time to go refill your coffee) an email entitled Rocket Math: Password Recovery that looks like this.  It gives you a link to go to a place where you can enter a new password.
 
P.S. Hint: This new system doesn’t know your old password, so you can use it again, which I highly recommend, if is is one you can remember.

Step 4: Go back to the “Login to your Account” screen and login.

Now you go back to the Rocket Math home page and click on “Teacher’s Subscription” on the blue bar, or hover and pull down to “Login,” or click on “Subscriber Account” on the orange bar.  All of them will take you to the login screen where you enter your email (as username) and new password.

How to access (get into) my Worksheet subscription

Access your Worksheet subscription by logging in where it says  “Worksheet Subscription,” (outlined in yellow.)  It will take you to the login page you are seeing here, or you can click this link now https://www.rocketmath.com/members/login.

If you can’t remember your password you can hit our handy “Reset Password” link (outlined in red) to change it.  That will ask you for your email.  After you enter it you can send yourself an email to change your password.

** Here’s a hint: we don’t mind if you “reset” your password to what you thought it was in the first place, even if that was what you had previously, we won’t tell you that you used that one already. In other words, you don’t really have to change it. 

If you still can’t get in, try the reset access button at the bottom of the page (outlined in green.)

Once you login you should be taken straight into the Rocket Math File cabinet (pictured to the right).  You can open drawers and print files right from here.  Note the drawers that are part of the Basic subscription are labeled in blue.  The red-labeled drawers are only accessible to those with a Universal subscription.

You can get to your account (to upgrade or renew or change something) by clicking on the “Subscription Manager” link (outlined in yellow).

Be sure to “Logout”  (outlined in red) when you’re done in the filing cabinet.

If your Rocket Math subscription has expired

What if your subscription to the Rocket Math “filing cabinet on the web” has expired?

If you are still using Rocket Math, please consider renewing your subscription now.  

 

I think subscriptions that renew automatically, even when you aren’t using them, are a rip-off, so we don’t use them.  With Rocket Math you will need to take action to renew your subscription.

If you can’t log-in to the page shown below, here is how to reset your password. 

How to Renew your subscription–in 2 steps.

1.  Click into the Subscription Manager page.

Once you are logged into your account you’ll see the blue header and in the center (outlined in yellow in the picture) you’ll see “Subscription Manager.”  Clicking on that will take you to your account page.

2.  Click on the Renew Subscription button. 

Your account page will look like this. The top bar has tabs including one to Renew Subscription.  Click on that and you can choose which type of  subscription you would like (Basic or Universal) and what size (individual, 3 teachers, 6 teachers or Whole School) and then choose your method of payment (credit card, PayPal, or Purchase Order).

 

 Thank you for your support.

Dr. Don

Rocket Math: Because going fast is more fun.

 

Learning subtraction computation–easily and confidently

In 18 easy-to-manage steps!

Rocket Math Universal Subscription now includes Subtraction–Learning Computation.

After becoming fluent with subtraction facts the best way for students to retain the knowledge of those facts is by doing subtraction computation.  If students have not been taught subtraction computation, Subtraction–Learning Computation breaks it down into 18 small, easy-to-learn steps that are numbered in a teaching sequence that leaves nothing to chance.  Even better the instructional materials include an assessment of all the skills in subtraction computation in order, so you can test the knowledge of the student(s) before beginning instruction to see where to start. You can use this assessment to find very specific “holes” in student skills and then have the exact problems and explanation to fill that hole.

Note that the number for each skill gives the grade level as well as indicating the teaching sequence.  Skill 3b is a 3rd grade skill and after skill 3g is learned the next in the sequence, skill 4a is best taught in fourth grade.  Minor changes have been made, but for the most part, the sequence of skills is drawn from M. Stein, D. Kinder, J. Silbert, and D. W. Carnine, (2006) Designing Effective Mathematics Instruction: A Direct Instruction Approach (4th Edition) Pearson Education: Columbus, OH.

(1b) Subtract from 2 digits; no renaming.

(2a) Subtract from 2digits; renaming required.

(2b) Subtract from 3 digits; borrow from 10s.

(3a) Subtract from 3 digits; borrow from 100s.

(3b) Subtract from 3 digits; borrow either place.

(3c) Subtract tens minus one facts.

(3d) Subtract from 3 digits; zero in 10s; borrow 10s or 100s.

(3e) Read and write thousands numbers, use commas.

(3f) Subtract from 4 digits; borrow from 1000s.

(3g) Subtract from 4 digits; borrow once or more.

(4a) Subtract from 4 digits; zero in 10s or 100s column

(4b) Subtract from 4 digits; zero in 10s column, 1 in 100s.

(4c) Subtract hundreds minus one facts.

(4d) Subtract from 4 digits; zero in 10s and 100s column.

(4e) Subtract 1, 2, or 3 digits from 1,000.

(4f) Subtract 5 and 6 digits with borrowing.

(5a) Subtract thousands minus one facts.

(5b) Subtract from a number with four zeroes.

For each skill there is a suggested Teaching Script giving the teacher/tutor/parent consistent (across all the skills we use the same explanation) language of instruction on how to do the skill.  My favorite part is the rule students are taught for when to borrow (often confusing for students): Bigger bottom borrows.  Simple, easy-to-remember and consistently correct.  The script helps walk the student through the computation process.  For the teacher, in addition to the script, there are answer keys for the five worksheets provided for each skill.

Each worksheet is composed of two parts.  The top has examples of the skill being learned that can be worked by following the script.  After working through those examples with the teacher the student is then asked to work some review problems of addition problems that are already known.  The student is asked to do as many as possible in 3 minutes—a kind of sprint.  If all is well the student should be able to do all the problems or nearly all of them, but finishing is not required.  Three minutes of review is sufficient for one day.

There are five worksheets for each skill.  Gradually as the student learns the skill the teacher/tutor/parent can provide progressively less help and the student should be able to do the problems without any guidance by the end of the five worksheets.  There are suggestions for how to give less help in the teaching scripts.

Learning multiplication computation–NEW program in Rocket Math

After becoming fluent with multiplication facts the best way for students to retain the knowledge of those facts is by doing multiplication computation.  If students have not been taught multiplication computation, this program breaks it down into small, easy-to-learn steps that are numbered in a teaching sequence that leaves nothing to chance.  Even better the instructional materials include an assessment of all the skills in multiplication computation in order, so you can test the knowledge of the student(s) before beginning instruction to see where to start.

Note that the number for each skill gives the grade level as well as indicating the teaching sequence.  Skill 3b is a 3rd grade skill and after skill 3e is learned the next in the sequence is skill 4a.  The sequence of skills is drawn from M. Stein, D. Kinder, J. Silbert, and D. W. Carnine, (2006) Designing Effective Mathematics Instruction: A Direct Instruction Approach (4th Edition) Pearson Education: Columbus, OH.

 

 

(3b) Multiplying 1-digit times 2-digit; no renaming

(3c) Multiplying 1-digit times 2-digit; carrying

(3d) Multiplying 1-digit times 2-digit, written horizontally.

(3e) Reading and writing thousands numbers, using commas.

(4a) Multiplying 1-digit times 3-digit

(4b) Multiplying 1-digit times 3-digit; zero in tens column

(4c) Multiplying 1 digit times 3 digit, written horizontally

(4d) Multiplying 2-digits times 2-digits.

(4e) Multiplying 2-digits times 3-digits.

(5a) Multiplying 3-digits times 3-digits.

(5b) Multiplying 3-digits times 3-digits; zero in tens column of multiplier.

For each skill there is a suggested Teaching Script giving the teacher/tutor/parent consistent (across all the skills we use the same explanation) language of instruction on how to do the skill.  The script helps walk the student through the computation process.  For the teacher, in addition to the script, there are answer keys for the five worksheets provided for each skill.

Each worksheet is composed of two parts.  The top has examples of the skill being learned that can be worked by following the script.  After working through those examples with the teacher the student is then asked to work some review problems of addition problems that are already known.  The student is asked to do as many as possible in 3 minutes—a kind of sprint.  If all is well the student should be able to do all the problems or nearly all of them, but finishing is not required.  Three minutes of review is sufficient for one day.

There are five worksheets for each skill.  Gradually as the student learns the skill the teacher/tutor/parent can provide progressively less help and the student should be able to do the problems without any guidance by the end of the five worksheets.  There are suggestions for how to give less help in the teaching scripts.

You have to require your students to model

Have them model the correction procedure rather than the latest fashions.

You can’t just tell your students the three steps of the Rocket Math correction procedure.  That’s not enough to be sure they know it.  The best way to determine if the students know the procedure is to require them to model it.

Do this, not just when you start Rocket Math, but any time you see that students are NOT doing the correction procedure the right way.  If they start to slip or zone out, the best thing to do is stop them from doing Rocket Math and spend a few days requiring them to model how to correct your errors, one at a time, while everyone listens.   Do it for ten minutes each day (during Rocket Math time) for several days–at least until you have had every student get a chance to “be your checker.”

Require them to model the correction procedures while you role play being a student making errors.

You have to role play being a student and you have to make the ALL the errors which they have to learn how to correct.  You have the worksheet and your students have the answer key in front of them.  Choose one at a time to be your “checker.”

First, ask that student WHEN should they should correct you.  They should say (in any order),

When you make an error. 

When you hesitate. 

When you say the problem wrong. 

When you don’t say the whole problem and the answer. 

Second, ask that student HOW they should correct you.  They should say (in order)

1.  Stop. Interrupt the student and say the correct problem and the answer.

2. Repeat.  Have the student repeat the correct problem and answer three times. 

3. Back up.  Have the student back up three problems and begin again.  

Third, begin practicing as if you were a student and then make errors.  Then require the student you’ve selected to be your checker to model the three-step correction procedure.   They should interrupt you and say the whole problem and the answer, ask you to say it three times, and then after you’ve repeated it three times, they should tell you to back up three problems and begin again.  You’ll end up counting together and coming to agreement about where to start and then beginning again.  But remember, they have to know not just HOW to correct, but also WHEN to correct.

Fourth, be sure to make all four kinds of errors to see if your “checker” recognizes all of them.  Try reading just the answers and see if your checker follows the correction procedure.  Definitely do a two second hesitation and if they don’t jump in to correct you, prompt them to do so.  Read the problem wrong as well as say the wrong answer.  Prompt the correction procedure if the student doesn’t do it the right way or at the right time.  If you have to prompt a student then they aren’t ready yet.  Keep going around the class, calling on each of your students to be your checker, and make sure they do it correctly and prompt them if they don’t.  Go back and call on any students who needed prompting and see if they can do it without prompting now. Keep making them model the correction procedure until everyone can do it the right way WITHOUT PROMPTING.

**The correction poster (pictured above) is available in the Rocket Math store under Organization and Training materials.  Item #2014 Corrections poster $18 

Are you off to a good start with Rocket Math?

By now you’ve got Rocket Math up and running in your class.  If you’re hard-working, dedicated and smart you have read the instructions thoroughly.  If you need motivation to do so (I know it’s a lot to read through), check out this blog: Without the directions you may get lost!   So that’s the first thing to know.

If you want to quiz yourself (or your staff) Dr. Don has created a 20 question quiz you can take.  Where, how, and why you might want to do so, is explained in this blog that asks, “Do you know how to make Rocket Math enjoyable?”

Most importantly, you should be walking around during Rocket Math practice listening to your students to be sure they are correcting errors and hesitations the way they should–like every single time!  How important it is for you to be carefully monitoring practice cannot be stressed enough.   It’s not life or death, but it is learning or pretending, so you have to be certain that practice is going as it should.    If you need convincing please read this blog:  Monitor, monitor, monitor!

You can structure your self-evaluation, or get someone else to observe and help you evaluate yourself with the 100 point Observation form.  If you want to know, “How well do I implement Rocket Math?” this is the tool for you.  Click on the link here to get to the blog that will explain it as well as links to the form itself.

Finally, if monitoring or observations reveal that your students are NOT practicing as they should, what should you do about it.  Here is an FAQ on the topic, “How do I get my students to practice math facts the right way?”   And below is a video where Dr. Don shows what you must do to each students how to practice the right way.  Sorry, there’s no exciting gun play or car chases, but this is important to see.  If your students are not correcting the right way, this is what you have to do, so it’s valuable.

 

 

 

How well do you implement Rocket Math?

Here’s how to find out.

Use the 100 point Rocket Math Observation form to self-evaluate, or have someone observe your class doing Rocket Math and use the form to evaluate you.  The form observes and evaluates seventeen different indicators of the quality of your Rocket Math implementation.

You or your observer begin by looking at four important indicators of the quality of student practice.  The quality of the paired practice of your students provides most of the value of Rocket Math.  Accordingly, these four indicators provide nearly half of the 100 points.  If one or two of these things are not in place (tutors aren’t listening carefully and correcting errors AND hesitations, for example) the implementation will not earn high marks, because students won’t be learning nearly as well as they should or could.

The other thirteen indicators are mostly about the efficiency with which Rocket Math runs.  If it takes more than 15 minutes a day to complete Rocket Math, it won’t happen every day.  If Rocket Math doesn’t happen every day, students do not learn nearly as well as they should or could.

Where can you find the 100 point Observation form?

There are three places you can find this handy form.  (1) It is included in hard copy form in the Administrator and Coach Handbook which we sell and ship to you.

(2) The 100 point Observation form is also available for free on the Resources/Educator’s Resource page on our website where you can find this link to its pdf.

(3) And finally in the Rocket Math subscription filing cabinet, in the Forms and Information drawer, there is a section (pictured on the left) that is devoted to all the information in the Administrator and Coach Handbook and near the bottom you’ll see the 100 point Observation form for you to print out.

5 easy ways to get help running Rocket Math.

Here are 5 ways to get help with the procedures for successful Rocket Math implementation.

1.) Use the ***NEW*** search function.  At the upper left of the blue navigation bar is an icon of a magnifying glass.  Click on that and a search bar opens in the middle of the page.  Click within the search bar and you can type in whatever you are looking for.  It will bring up blogs, parts of the directions, basically anything I’ve written on the subject–which is a lot.  You can get pretty specific very fast, so try this first.  I’m very excited to have added this feature this week, which is why it is top of my list!

2)  FAQs.  Look at the Rocket Math FAQs page.  Click on the linked words to the left, or navigate to it.  The FAQs page is the third Rocket Math Filing cabinet on the webitem under ABOUT in navigation.  The FAQs page displays all of the questions from the teacher directions, and my answers, so you can scroll down to the topic you need quickly.   However, all the FAQs will show up in the search function as well.

2.5) The FAQs are also available in the Rocket Math filing cabinet.  They are in the top drawer, the “Forms and Information” drawer of the filing cabinet.  There are titles of the FAQs so you can open and print any one you wish.  Good for sharing with other staff.

3) Rocket Math YouTube channel. You can go to the Rocket Math YouTube channel.  Click on the linked words to the left, or search for Rocket Math in You Tube.  If you scroll down the page you can click on “View Full Playlist” and then you’ll be able to see all the topics that are available.  Right now there are 37 videos, but that could change if we add some more.

4) DVD training.  Order the Workshop Training DVD (#2004) for $29  This is the whole training from Dr. Don filmed and broken into chapters.  It is over 3 hours and gives a lot of rationale for the procedures we recommend.  Very helpful if Rocket Math is new for your staff.  Really important to do things as recommended.  Having coached this in many schools for many years, I can promise you it will go better if you follow the directions!

5) Contact Dr. Don.  Really.  You can call me (800) 488-4854 during west coast school hours and I’ll probably be able to answer the phone directly.  It’s a joy for me to talk about implementing Rocket Math with teachers, so don’t be shy.  But if you don’t reach me, please send an email to [email protected] rather than leave your phone number because during the school day teachers are very hard to reach.  I’d rather just write an answer in an email so we don’t miss each other.  And if it is a new question I’ll probably turn my answer into a blog that can be found through the search function.

Do you know how to make Rocket Math enjoyable?

Doing Rocket Math ought to be one of the highlights of the school day.  If done correctly students should really enjoy daily practice, getting better, learning to go fast on facts.  Find out if you (or your staff) know just how to do that by taking the new 20 question Quiz that Dr. Don has posted onto the website.  You can find it on the website under Resources/Educator Resources as well as on the link in the previous sentence.

New tricks!  There are some secret things in the quiz that are not even in the directions!  There are tricks of the trade–ideas that have been put into blogs, which are part of the 20 item quiz.  Some of these tricks were not known at the time of  the original  Teacher Directions, which are still a good source of info about how to do Rocket Math.

Dr. Don recommends that you print out a copy of the answer key here.  Then after you give the quiz to the staff, you can discuss the correct answers using the answer key.  This is a great activity to engage all your staff, new and old, in a discussion of how to implement Rocket Math.  Care in the implementation makes a lot of difference in how much students enjoy the experience and how successfully they learn.  Remember, that the best motivator is success, so enabling success for all students is the key!

As always, if you have a question feel free to call Dr. Don at 888-488-4854.  His favorite thing to discuss is implementation of Rocket Math.